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Full text of "City of Binghamton;"

J9O0^i90i 





Glass ^n^ 

Book__.ELi 



CITY OF BINGHAMTON 





■J:5S>* 



The Great Manufacturing Center of 
Southern New York. Its Growth, 
Wonderful lieauty, Rai)id Develop- 
ment and Natural Advantages, to- 
gether with an Account of its Repre- 
sentative Enterprises. 



PUBLISHED^;' ///^'BOARDS/TRADE 



NINETEEN HUNDRED AND ONE 




Hon. Jerome DeWitt, [Vlayor 



Binobatntoii :fl3oavb of XTrabe 



©fficers for 1901 



Presideut, P. J. McTlGHE 
Vice-President. Reed B. Fkeeman 



Secretary, R. B. LOCKWOOD 



John Andekson, Sec. Water Commissioners 
C. E. Beach, of the Star Electric Co. 

B. A. Baumann, with H. J. Gaylord, Real Estate 
I. T. Deyo, of Carver, Deyo & Hitchcock 
O. J. FowLEK, of the Osgood Scale Co. 
R. B. Freeman, President Bing. Overall Co. 

C. H. Hitchcock, of Carver, Devo & Hitchcock 



Treasurer. E. R. Ma.son 



iIru6tCC3 

C. F. HoTCHKiN, Real Estate 

R. B. LoCKWOOD, Sec'y Commercial Envelope Co. 

E. R. Mason, Jeweler and ( ipticiau 

W. R. Mii.LEK, of W. R. Miller iV- Co. 

B. B. Ml Faiiuen, Pres. The Commercial Envelope Co. 

Limittd 
P. J. M. Tk.he, of McTighe, Truesdell & Davidge 



B. B. McFadden 



E. R. Allen, 

Freight Agent, Lackawanna 



StanMno Committees 

Stati£itic» Committee 
E. R. Mason 



Craneportatlon Committee 

E. D. HORtJAN, 
Freight Agent, Erie 



E. H. TlTCHENEU, 
of E. H. Titchener & Co. 

Chas. Wadsworth, 

Freight Agent, D. & H. 



John Anderson 



C. H. HOTCIIRIN 



loohout Committee 
Chas. E. Lee, 

President of the Ensign Lumber Co. 



fflnancc Commtttee 

E. R. Mason 



O. J. Fowler 



B. A. Baumann 



fiDciiibcre of <Ibe 36oal•^ ot (Il•a^e 



K. R. Allen 

John Anderson 

Babcock. Hinds & Undkkvvood 

James H. Barnes 

Harry S. Barrett 

J. H Bartlett 

A. S. Barileit 
AlI'Ked B. Bartoo 
Otis J. Bates 

B. a. Baumann 
F. J. Bavless 

C. E. Beach 
Irving W. Bean 
Junius F. Bishop 
Ransom Black 
Blakeney & Gawne 
F. W. Brandt 
\Vm. E. Bray 

*L) D. Broun 
J. W. Brown 
Ausitn S. Bumf 
H. E. Bundy 
Callahan & Douglas 

D. H. Carver 
Walter Christie 
S. T. Clark 

E. W. CoNKLiN iV Sun 
m. j. correit 
Cropper & Siaekord 
James Daly 

A. E. Davis 
I. T. Deyo 

F. W. Downs 
S. B. Drass 
George Fowler 
O. J. Fowler 
Reed B. Freeman 

♦Deceased 



Charles Gale 
Geo. E. Green 
Royal A. Gunnison 
Haring & Bogert 
Geo. M. Harris 
Oscar S. Heller 
J. M. Hknw.m.d&Co. 
Wm. H. Hickev 
S. J. Hirschmann 
C. H. HncncocK 
E. F. Hopion 

E. D. HORGAN 

C. F. HorcHKiN 
Humes & Smiiti 
Edward F. Jones 
Fred G. Jones 
Gerry Jones 
S. J. Kelley 
J. \V. Kennedy 
W. P. Ke;nnedy 
J. M. Kilmer 
Chas. J. Knapp 
Chas. E. Lee 
R. B. Lockwood 

F. J. Mable 
J. W. Manikk 

E. R. Mason 

B. B. McFadden 

F. H. McFari.and 
Edgar C. McKai.i.or 
Chas. McKinnev 
Wm. M. McLean 
McManamy & Rodman 
P. J. McTlGHE 

S. C. Millard 
W. R. Miller 
Geo. H. Moon 



Hartwell Morse 

B. H. Nelson Jr. & Son 

F. B. Newell 

D. H. Ogden 
Geo. F. O'Neil 
Louis A. Osgood 

E. D. OSTKOM 

e. l. ostrom 
Wm. G. Phelps 
Edward E. Powell 

G. Tracy Rogers 
Julius E. Rogers 
Henry Rubin 

Le\\*IS bEYMOUK 
J. E. SllAPLEV 

F. L. Sheldon 
J. M. Signor 

SissoN Bros.-Welden Co. 

Dr. S. E. Smiih 

H. A. Smith 

Dr. E. E. Snvder 

Hakkv a. Siephens iV Ct 

U. S. Stevens 

Chas. M. Stone 

James D. Stratton 

J. W. SlURTEVANT 

James Sullivan 

E. H. TlTCHENER 

Chas. Wadsworth 
W. J. Welsh 
Chas. A. Weed 
James B. Weed 
Edward W. Weeks 
Harvey Westcott 
Fked B. Wheeler 
James H. Wilson 



(Iit\> ©fficcvs for 1000*1901 



Hon. |i',KiiMK DeWmt, A/tij< 



C. P. Radkkek, Treasurer 



John E. Wentz 



Irmni; C. Hi ll, City CUrL- 

Frank Siew art, Corporation Counsel 



S. Mack Smiih, Reconhr 



CiIAKI.es D. AiDRU II 

3iunicc of tbe peace 

W.\IMIN E. RoilERTS 



S. E, M<iNRoK, City hnginccr 
William P. Davis 



CitB 3u&c)c 
Henry C. Olmsteh 

F. vSkvkrson, Overseer of the Poor 

Thomas L. Hogan, Janitor City Bnildiui:; 

IdHN Halkv, Assistant Janitor City Bia/./ing- 

S B. Ht'NT, Sealer of \\'ei,i^lits an,l Measures 

Michael Lldvd, Sexton City Cemetery 



Henry D. Devoe 



Clarence M. Slauson 
S. L. Smlih 
Frank P. Hough 
Charles S. Darling 
Amos J. Bush 
Lawrence M. Lyons 



Constables 

1. 1) French 



.1i3oarC> of HlOcrmcn 

S 1> Smi I II, Ci esiilent 
first Hon/ H, H WonhBURN 

Seeon,l \\'ar<l James J. Cci.han'e 

'Jliinl Want Wm. E. Doi;i:ins 

Fourth ll'anl Michael F. Long 

Fifth ll'anl Wm. T. Cornell 

Sixth Ward George M. Ely 

George M. Moffatt . Thirteenth IVanl 



Gi.oRGE II Hermans 



Seventh Hard 

Eighth Hard 

Ninth Hard 

Tenth Ward 

Eleventh Ward 

Tivelfth Ward 



Commissioners 



Police eommi$sioner$ 

Mayor DeWitt, President 
T B. Crary Jonas M. Kilmer George W. Welden Cornelius Ackerman 

Charles W. Gennet, Clerk William H. Moore, Chief of Police 



Board of Rcalth 

Mayor DeWht, President 
Charles E. Smith, Cluurman pro tern. Claron M. Blewer David E. Barni'm W. F. Harding 

TiMniin Good D. L. McNamara, M D. 

I. AijELKERT Hix, Healtli Officer O. R. Mason, Pliimhing Inspector Paoi a A. Greenmum. Sanitary Inspector 

William H. Abbott, Secretary and Registrar of Vital Statistics Major C- H. Hitchcock, Attorney 



Board of Street eommissioners 

Mayor DeWitt, President 

Lewis Baird W. E. Cakfeniek William E. Bray Walter J. Moon 

W. Paul Mosher. Cleric John M. Seabury, Siipt. of Streets W. H. DuBois, Sideu'alk Inspector 



Examinina and Supervising Board of Plumbers and Plumbing 

O. R Mason Dan id J. Malane John F. Hurley S E. .Monroe Lewis A. Gali'IN 

John J. Irving,, Clerk 



Board of Tire eommissioners 

Mayor DeWitt, President 
William F. Le.ntz J. W. Lvon Irving W. Butler Hoi.lis M. Gitciiell 

Irving C. Hull, Clerk C. N. Hogg, Chief Engineer 

James R. Eldridge, First Assistant Engineer Albert H. Lyon, Second Assistant Engineer 

Timothy J. McNamara, Fire Marshal Carl J. Livingston, Superintendent of Fire .Harm System 



Board of Education 

WiiLiAM W. Farley Charles A. Weei. Charles W. Gennet Julius E. Rogers 

Charles M. Stone Hiram Barnum M. R. F. McCarthy 

Chakles M. Stone, Pitsident 

A. J. Inloes. Sfcrc-tary Darwin L. Barl>\vell, Siipt. of Schools S. D. Whuur, Attciuiancf Officer 

R. V. BoGART. Superhitendent of Giouiids and ruii/d/ngs 



Ro$$ Park eommlssioners 

John Anderson T. I. Lacev Allen Banks Gerry Jones 

M. L. HOLLISTER A. S. Bartlett B. W. Mosher 

A. S. Barilett, President 
Allen Banks. Vice-President Iuhn Anderson. Ticuurer B. W. Mosher. 5<'<v<-A(r>' 



CiPil Service Commissioners 

Harry C. Walker AdklulkiJ. Sciilagei; Edward Guilkovle 

Harry C. VValkf.k. Frcsident M. Pemuroke Coni.don. Secretary 



Bingbamton £ity hospital 

Ma\or UEWni-, PrcstdenI 
ihtakij of managers 
Charles M. Stone William Wirt Newell Whjjam S Lawyer 

Julius E. Rogers James Sullivan Charles F. Sisson 



Board of Ulater eommissioncrs Elected 

Hon. Duncan R. Grant John Bayless Jei-terson Kingman 

H. a. Smlth Moses Stofpard 

John Anderson. Secretary and Stipcrintendeiit 
John D. Davidson. M. F. Dillon, Inspectors 




Junction of the Susquehanna and Chenango Rivers 



INTRODUCTION 




Tj ' HIS book aims to give as concisely and accurately as possible all the facts tliat prospect- 
« ive residents may want to know about the City of ISinghamton, N. Y., its industries and 
manufactures, its government, its natural advantages, and the inducements that it 
has to offer to the homeseeker and manufacturer To do any sort of justice to 
Ringhamton in a few printed pages is a hopeless task ; but if this i:)amphlet shall in- 
cite on the part of those to whom it shall come a fuller investigation into the city's 
advantages, it will not wholly have failed in its purpose. 15inghamton is a city of 
about 45,000 people, lying in Southern New York at the confluence of the Susi[ue- 
hanna and Chenango rivers. Five railroads radiate from the city in almost every 
direction. The leading industries are the manufacture of cigars, carriages, wood 
alcohol, acids and acetate of lime, boots and shoes, chairs, crackers, patent medicines, iron foun- 
dry products, clothing, time recorders, envelopes, folding b->xes, sportsman's goods, etc. Last 
year 90,000,000 cigars were made in the city, a number that would provide several cigars for 
every smoker in the United States and its new possessions 

At the last sale of city four per cent, bonds 10;;. 605 was paid for tlic privilege of buying 
them, which shows the stability of the city's credit. The city tax rate last year was .0152 on the 
dollar, and the state and county .0086. The area of the corporation is 6,.|oo acres There are 
25.19 miles of electric railway, 125 miles of streets, nearly eight miles of pavement, nineteen 
public schools, fortv-one church bodies, ten newspapers (daily and weekly) and three public 
parks. 

Binghamton's situation is picturescpie. It lies in the Sus(|uelianna and Chenango val- 
leys, hills rising on nearly every side From the top of one of these, on a summer's day, the 
town looks as if it were embowered in a great forest, so numerous are the shade trees — save 
where the brick and stone of the business section makes a contrasting blotch of color. Nearly 
as far as the eye can reach down the Susquehanna stretches what is practically the city, for 
Lestershire, with its great industries, though incorporated as a separate village, is actually a 
part of Binghamton. And further down, nine miles from the City Hall, is Union, where they 
are building the new city of Endicott, with industries to employ tliousands. So closely is this 
connected with Ringhamton by the electric railroad, and so rapidly is the connecting territory 
being built up that it does not recjuire the gift of prophecy to foresee the day when this, too, will 
be a part of a great municipality twelve miles in length from east to west — the Greater Bing- 
hamton. 

Topographically the city is divided by the rivers and railroads into five main sections, 
known locally as the West Side, the North Side, the South Side, " Morningside," or the East 
Side, and the Central City — the district last named lying east of the Chenango and north of the 
Suscjuehanna. So closely are these knit together by the bridges that they form a homogeneous 
whole, with no pre'sent local jealousies, and all work together for the common good. The con- 



jitruction of a magnificent viaduct spanning the numerous railroad tracks at Chenango street and 
giving uninterrupted communication with the district north of the railroads is a recent achieve- 
ment of great importance, due in a great measure to the efforts of the Board of Trade. 




Court Street, Looking West 



HISTORY AND GROWTH 

The man from whom Binyhamton took its name was WilHam Bingham, of Philadelphia. 
An Englishman by birth, he came to America as a colonist, served in the American army dur- 
ing the Revolution and earned a cominission. At the close of the war he went into business in 
Philadelphia, where he accumulated a fortune. 

To him and to two others, Robert Lettis Hooper and James Wilson, was granted on June 
27, 1786, a patent for a tract of 30,620 acres. It lay on both sides of the Susquehanna river 
and included parts of the present towns of Union, Vestal, Binghamton, Conklinand Kirkwood. 
In 1790 the trio divided the tract among themselves, the part containing the site of the present 
City of Binghamton falling to Mr. Bingham. 

The first settler in the vicinity of what is now Binghamton was Captain Joseph Leonard, 
a Revolutionary soldier, who came up the .Susquehanna river from Pennsylvania in 17S7. He 
found, occupying a temporary cabin here, a man known as James Lyon. In company with the 
Indian trader, Amos Draper, Captain Leonard had a conference with the natives and secured from 
them a lease for ninety-nine years of a square mile of land, agreeing to pay as rental a barrel of 
corn a year. This was about three miles above the mouth of the Susquehanna. This lease 
was not confirmed by the State, but the land was later sold and was held without trouble by the 
purchasers. Other settlers arrived soon afterwards and a little settlement sprang up which 
was known as Chenango. 

In 1800 Mr. Bingham appointed as his local agent General Joshua Whitney. Before that 

time some plans had been made for estab- 
lishing a village on the site of the present 
city, at the junction of the Susquehanna 
and Chenango rivers. How far these plans 
had gone is uncertain, but they were proba- 
bly somewhat indefinite. As soon, however, 
as the new agent took charge he bent his 
energies towards establishing a settlement 
on the present site. Streets were laid out 
and various inducements made to the peo- 
ple of Chenango to move to the "Point." 
On July 4, 1800, William Bingham conveyed 
3^' to Joshua Whitney 215 acres in this tract, 
and the latter put up a house. In 1801 an 
act was passed authorizing the holding of 
court in Chenango Point, and the following- 
year a court house was built. This was an 
event which finally established the suprem- 
acy of the new Chenango Point over the lit- 
Residence of Chas. M. Turner, Front Street tie hamlet up the river. 




One of the inducements held out to settlers by General Whitney was that a bridge 
was to be built across the Chenango, at what is now Court street. 'I'his, however, was not con- 
structed until 1808, when it was built as a private enterprise. Main and Front streets were laid 
out ahdut this time, buildings were erected at the four corners near the bridge, and an air of 




Th<- Viiiclurt iind D. L. St W. Station 



modest activity was apparent. In 1812 a company of Indian chiefs arrived at the little settle- 
ment and claimed the land on behalf of the former occupants of the region. John A. Collier 
carefully investigated their claims and assured the visitors that they were not valid, after which 
the red men departed cjuietly. 



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in Lyons' Park 



This year was notable also from the 
fact that it marked the date of the lim- 
ited incorporation of Binghamton as a 
villajje. The population at this time 
was between 250 and .^00. Ten yeai's 
later the village was regularly incor- 
])oratcd. The construction of the C^ie- 
nango canal, authorized liy the legis- 
lature in iS^:;,:;, was of \ast importance 
to Minghamton. Its northern terminus 
was Utica, its southern Binghamton. 
The first canal boat arrived in Bing- 
hamton on Ma\' 6, 1H37, and was 
greeted with general rejoicing. Three 
years later the population was 2,000, 
and the i-esidents of Binghamton began 
to think that it might some day be- 
come a \-erv laroe villaue. 



But wliat was in many respects 
the most important event in the 
earlier histor}' of the place oc- 
curred in 1.S48 This was the 
opening of the New York &• Erie 
railroad. From this time the 
growth was rapid. In 1850 there 
were 4,000 inhabitants or more. 
The next year the acts incorporat- 
ing the village were amended, 
and the village limits were ex- 
tended. The j-ear i860 saw Bing- 
'hamton a village of 9,000, and one 
of the most important stations on 
the line of the Erie road. Seven 
years later it was incorporated as 
a city and divided into five wards. 
Its popidation was then 10,000. 



:^J 




W^ 







View "n Lyons' Parl< 



From this time Binu-hamton has never taken a backward step. Her growth has been 
steady, and though there "have been times of particularly rapid growth, none of it has been of 
the mushroom sort. The founders laid the foundations strong and deep; their descendants have 
built upon these foundations wisely and well. The population in 1870 was 12,692; in 1875, 
15,518, and in 1880, 17,317. During the next ten years the number of inhabitants had doubled, 
the census in 1890 showing a population of 35,005. Today a fair estimate of Binghamton's in- 
habitants is 45,000. And the city is growing every month. 



PUBLIC PARKS 

Just south of the city, not more than a mile from the business center, lies a plot of 
natural woodland of surpassing beauty. Through it runs a picturesque defile, winding around 
the base of a densely wooded hill. Roads as firm as stone wind among the trees and lead to 
the summit of the hill, where from " The Lookout " a view of the city and valley breaks upon 
the eye — rivers like silver ribbons sparkling in the sunlight, toy trains creeping along like 
snails, and a busy city spread out at one's feet 

At the base of the hill there is plenty of human life and animation. Scattered among 
the trees, viewing the animals or patronizing the various attractions there are several thousand 
people every day. From the stand on the hill-side a band plays gaily, and a merry-go-round 
whirls with happy children as passengers. Picnic parties by the dozen are scattered in the big 
dining-pavilion or at the many rustic tables among the trees. 

Such is Ross Park on a summer's day. It is a resort which is enjoyed not only by the 
citizens of Binghamton, but also by thousands of excursionists who come during the season from 
points on the railroads There are few cities in the country which can point to a park that is so 
near to nature as this. There is nothing artificial about it, care having been taken in all the 
improvements to preserve all the natural woodland features. So successful has been the result 
that in a quiet corner of the park the herd of deer and elk seem to be grazing in a real forest 

During the season the Binghamton Railroad Company provides daily entertainments in 
the open air, free, and band concerts, afternoon and evening. They are viewed by thousands, 
the company obtaining its remuneration for the entertainments out of the extra street car traf- 
fic in this line. Refreshments are sold on the ground, but intoxicants are prohibited. 

Besides this there are two smaller parks which have not been greatly improved as yet. 
One is situated in what is known as the " German Settlement," and the other is in the eastern 
part of the city As the city grows these will some day be charming breathing places for the 
people. The parks are under the control of a Board of Park Commissioners. Lyons' Park, on 
the South Side, owned by Daniel Lyons, is also an attractive spot. 

Another favorite pleasure resort is the Casino, a beautiful park owned and controlled by 
the Binghamton Railroad Company at Endicott. Frequent car service is provided by the com- 



pany, 25 cents beinaf charged for the round trip from the city. Entertainments are also pro- 
vided here by the railroad company, and picnic parties find pleasnre on the banks of the Sus- 
quehanna, which flows past the park. Little lakes, fountains and lawns add to the attractive- 
ness of the place. 



tk..^^^^ 







Residence of Daniel Lyons, Conlilin Avenue 



CHURCHES 



Prospective residents of Binghamton may rest assured that the} could find no place, 
large or small, which can offer to them better church advantages than this city. Hundreds of 

thousands of dollars 
are invested in the 
c h u r c h e s, whose 
membership is large 
and active. What- 
ever may be the case 
elsewhere, it has 
been remarked upon 
by visitors that 
empty pews are not 
the fashion here. 
This may be due in 
part to the fact that 
tlie local churches 
have a more than 
usually able body of 
clergy. Some of 
these have a reputa- 
tion which extends 
far, and many of the 
churches are among 
the largest in their 
denomination. In 
short, it may be said 
that Binghamton is, 
to a degree, a church 
supporting town, 
which means that it 
is for the most part a 
moral and law-abid- 
ing town. 
This could not truthfully have been said of the early settlement. At the close of the 
Eighteenth Century and the opening of the Nineteenth the pioneer preachers seem to have had 
consideraV)le difficulty in getting a hold u])on the settlers. The first religious services were 
established b\' a Baptist minister, named Howe, who came to Chenango Point in 1790. 




West Pr«'sl>ytprian Church 



An account of the pres- 
ent condition of some of 
the most prominent de- 
nominations may be of 
interest. 

PuiiSHYTERiAN. — There 
are at present seven Pres- 
b)'terian societies, with a 
total membership of sev- 
eral thousand. They are 
the First, West, North, 
Ross Memorial, Immanuel 
Chapel, Broad Avenue and 
Floral Avenue. The de- 
nomination has a church 
in every cpiarter of the 
city. The First Church is 
one of the ten largest 
Presbyterian societies in 
the United States, and the 
name of the pastor, the 
Rev. G. Parsons Nichols, 
D. D , is known through- 
nut the country. The 
North and the West 
Churches also have large 
parishes, the latter hav- 
ing lately erected a mag- 
nificent stone structure on 
Main street, which, with 
its grounds and fittings, 
is valued at i5;7o,ooo. All 
the other societies are 
strong and jirosperous. 

MeTHODISI' El'ISCOP.XL — 

The denomination that 
can boast the largest num- 
ber of local churches is 
the Methodist Episcopal, 
which has ten societies. 
Of these the most prom- 
inent are the Centenary, 
in the center of the city, 
and the Tabernacle on the 




Tabernacle |VI. E. Church 



West Side. While the other organizations are somewhat smaller, none is feeble, and Metho- 
dists are an important factor in city life. Binghamton city and district are among the most im- 
portant in Wyoming Conference. The presiding elder is the Rev. L. C. Floyd, Ph. D. , of this city. 

Baptist. — The Baptists are represented by 



six churches — the First, Conklin Avenue, 
Main Street, Grace, Calvary and Park Avenue. 
The First Church has a fine edifice on Che- 
nango street. The church was destroyed by 
fire a few years ago and promptly rebuilt in 
the most modern style. A marked feature of 
the religious life of this church is its healthful 
progressiveness in theological thought. Dr. 
Phillips, the pastor, received the degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy at the University of 
London. 

Protestant Episcopal — The oldest 
church building in the city, and one of the 
most notable, is Christ Church on Washington 
street, which has already been referred to. 
It is of stone and was built in 1854 after de- 
signs by the architect of Trinity Church, New 
York. It is regarded as one of the best speci- 
mens of ecclesiastical architecture in the coun- 
try. Trinity Memorial Church, on Main street, 
is a splendid modern structure of stone. The 
Church of the Good Shepherd, on the South 
Side, has connected with it the House of the 
Good Shepherd, a worthy charitable institution. 
Roman Catholic. — The city is divided by 
the Roman Catholics into three large parishes 
—St. Patrick's, St. Mary's and St. Paul's, in 
each of which there is a membership of sev- 
eral thousand. St. Patrick's, on the West Side, 
was established in 1838 by the Rt. Rev. Bishop 
Hughes, and the present edifice cost $125,000. 
Connected with it are St. Joseph's Academy, 

St. James' Hall and a fine parochial residence, the whole property being immensely valuable. 

St. Mary's Church of the Assumption is a great modern building of brick at Court and Fayette 

streets, the interior of which is especially beautiful The pipe organ is one of the best in 

Southern New York. St. Paul's is a new parish on the North Side, 




First Presbyterian Churcli 



CoNGREGATiONALisT. — The First and Plymouth Churches are worthy examples of Congre- 
gationalism in Binghamton. While this denomination is not so numerous in New York as in 
the New England States, the First Church is one of the largest in the city and has a membership 
remarkable for its prominence and intelli- 
gence. It has generally had pastors of high 
rank in the denomination, its present brilliant 
minister being Dr. Nacy McGee Waters. 

Other Religious Bodies — The Christian, 
German Lutheran and Universalist churches 
and the Seventh Day Adventists have one or- 
ganization each. There are two Churches of 
Christ, Scientist, a rescue mission and corps 
of the Salvation Army and American Volun- 
teers. The Salvation Army conducts a "shel- 
ter " and a salvage department, and its splen- 
did work among the poor is cordially cooper- 
ated with by the churches. The Young Men's 
Christian Association owns a four-story brick 
building on Court street, where it has meeting 
halls, a reading-room, library, gymnasium 
and other conveniences. The Railroad Y. M. 
C. A. has a building near the railroad stations, 
and statistics show that in several branches 
of work it stands first in the State. It has 
plans for a fine new building. The Young- 
Women's Christian Association also occupies 
beautiful rooms and does an excellent work. 



BANKING FACILITIES 

For the convenient transaction of business, 
banks with ample capital and solid financial 
standing are of first importance. Binghamton 
is admirably equipped with institutions whose 
condition is of the most satisfactory character. 

The recent consolidation of three of the 
leading banks, the First National, the Suscjue- 




First Congregational Church 




ate, has provided one of the largest banking institutions in 
rst named of these had a capital of $200,000 and the other 
two of $100,000 each. 

The present banks and their 
capitalization are: First Na- 
tional, $400,000 ; Binghamton 
Trust Company, $300,000; City 
National, $200,000, and Peo- 
ple's $100,000. 

The Binghamton Clearing 
House was established in 1S91. 
Since then the annual clearings 
have nearly doubled, the fig- 
ures for the successive years 
being as follows: 



iS()i . . . 


.$ 12,522,200 


00 


,892 ... 


13,789,300 


00 


1893 ... 


I 5,404,200 


00 


IS94 .. 


I 7,460,800 


00 


1895 . . 


17,701,900 


00 


1896 . . . 


■ '6,345>300 


00 


1897... 


16,891,500 


GO 


1 898 . . . 


18,038,800 


00 


1899 .. 


19,317,700 


00 


1 900 . . . 


20,705,300 


00 



St. Mary's Church 



It will be noticed by this 
table that last year's clearings 
went far ahead of any in the 
history of the house. But, so 
far this year the banking busi- 
ness, bankers say, has been very 
much larger than it was for 
1900. However, the figures of 
the Clearing House show a de- 
crease of about five per cent. 
over the same period last year. 
This is due to the consolidation 
of three banks, already referred 
to, and does not give a correct 
view of the situation. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

The Fire Department is practically under the volunteer svsteni, composed of the follow- 
mo- eight companies: Excelsior Hook and Ladder Co. No. i, T. J. McNamara, foreman- Crys- 
tal Hose Co, No. I, Charles Cain, foreman; Alert Hose Co. No. 2, Charles Van Cleve foreman- 
Protection H os-e Co. No. 3, Jay Whitney, foreman; Fountain Chemical Engine Co No' 
4, John Lyon, foreman: Independent Hose Co No. 5, Charles S. Waring, foreman; Mechanics' 
Hose Co No 6, James F. Garvey, foreman: Rockbottom Hose Co. No. 7, James E Foster 
foreman. The department is well equipped, admirably managed, and has always proved en- 
tirely adequate to any demands made upon it. Steamer No. 3 is a second size LaFrance piston 
engine, purchased in 1S99. It is manned by three full-paid men, who respond to all alarms of 




Scene on Cuurl Street 



fi„^ Th.„ is a,s„ one ordinary h„»Yn|;a^4e--*l«;<^i°,rSsS^^^^ 

I " City of Binghamton," a second size Silsby i^?*^'^> P^^'^P^^^A^: „ears old, both of which 
Bennett'," a third size LaFrance rotary P^^P/^ made or he purchase of another engine, 
are held in reserve. Arrangements have also ^^^^ ^^J^^ ;°^^^\^^7,i„,, to the service, four part 
paid. or^^SlfSen^arn^^S^^ht who belong to the several com- 

panies. 




Residence of Benjamin B. iva^adden, Main Street 
With the exception of the bt.ilding oecnpied by *=Ch=mtal Comply ,he^^^ 
-S^^X^S^^y^ S?e'I=a"l=ty Sl^^^'£^ .. .o.„a.on.»d 



the chemical engine belong to the various companies. The Central Fire Station is a fine bnild 
wfsrs.d/Th^V'f' -"d a new fire station has just been completed on Ma'nstree on he 
West Side. The fire alarm system is of the Gamewell patent, and consists of fifty-six street boxel 




119 'iv"*^^ 

" n 1 




Residence of Thomas B. Crary, Main Street 



The total number of alarms of fire last year was 133. The total loss by fire was 
whi^hdaimforio""'"''^.''' "^! $■ 73.879.63. and the tot^i insurance on the property on 
wlml claim for loss w^^^^^^^^ ^^■^'^°^'°9o.oo. The amount of the budget for last year^was 
fhlS BiSfam on h?S ^ •'! ^^^P'-^^-^^ent IS fully competent is shown by the fact that 

tZf^lat,ZZ';%s^^^^^^ ^'"^^^ ^^' '^^-l^^-^- oyer aLntury, it has 



THE CLIMATE OF BINGHAMTON 

Notwithstanding the size of the city, its shaded sti'eets, velvety lawns and pure air make 
it a delightful place in which to spend the summer. Many residents prefer to remain in their 
cozy homes rather than to leave them for places that are called suminer resorts. 

A station of the United States Weather Bureau is located in the Government Building. 
It is at present in charge of W. E. Donaldson, who has prepared for this book the following 
account of the local climate: 

Average for tlic Year. 

Temperature 48° 

Precipitation 27.8 inches 

Snowfall 44 inches 

Hourly wind movement 6.5 miles 

Clear days 81 

Partly cloudy days 1 24 

Cloudy days 1 60 

Rainy days 144 

It can be safely stated that summer begins with the last destructive frost of spring and 
ends with the first destructive frost of autumn. This would limit the summer on an average in 
Binghamton from the 20th of May to the 10th of September. It is possible to have a destruct- 
ive frost in this section after the 20th of May or before the 10th of September, but this seldom 
occurs. In the past four years the lowest temperature from the 20th of May to the loth of 
September was 34°. 

The average number of hours the sun shines daily during the summer months is eight 
hours and twenty-four minutes, whereas the sun shines on the average only three hours and 
thirty-two minutes per day during the winter months. 

While the precipitation falls more frequently during the winter, the precipitation falls 
more rapidly in the summer. The average precipitation for the summer months is 2.35 inches, 
and for the winter months only i.Sr inches. 

The wind moves at the average rate of eight miles per hour during the winter, and onlv five 
miles per hour in the summer. In the summer the wind increases as the sun rises, and becomes 
calm after sundown; while the high winds of summer accompany thunder-storms and are of 
short duration 

June is invariably the mildest month of the year, the temperature never being oppres- 
sively high, nor too cool. During the past four years the temperature was above 90° on twenty- 
five days, one day in June, fourteen days in July and ten days in August. The highest temper 
ature in the past five years was 96^ on August loth, 1900. 

Warm waves when the temperature goes above 90° for several consecutive days are not 
frequent in Binghamton. The longest warm waves in the past four years occurred in July, 
1897, and in August, 1899, when the temperature was above 90° for four consecutive days. 
This would indicate that Binghamton had first-class qualifications as a summer resort. 



.STREETS. SEWERS AND BRIDGES 

Binghamton's streets are one of her greatest glories. There are 125 miles of them, lined 
for the most part with maples or elms, which in the older portions of the city have attained a 
noble growth. There are 7.64 miles of pavement now in use, and plans are being made for 
laying considerable more. Of this 4.63 miles is Trinidad sheet asphalt, .40 miles Alcatraz 
asphalt, . 165 miles Corning repressed brick, S85 miles Syracuse wire-cut brick, .615 miles Mack 
wire-cut brick, and .945 miles Park wire-cut brick. All the old wooden block pavement has 
been torn up in the march of progress and replaced with asphalt and brick. The total cost of 
all pavements has been ^Isgg.sog 66 — !|3io,gS3.g2 having been spent for asphalt and $1 14,376.87 
for brick. The balance, $170,018 87, was expended upon the old wooden pavements. The cart 
and can system is used in cleaning the streets, the cleaners being uniformed in white duck with 
a straw helmet. The pavements are also llushed. The general neatness of the streets and 
surroundings has earned for Binghamton the title " Parlor City." 

The system of sewerage is kept up to the highest standard, sewers being constantly ex- 
tended to meet the needs of the growing city. To the care exercised in their construction is 
due in no small measure the excellent public health. At the close of the past year there had 
been constructed 34.17 miles of brick and pipe sewers, of which ;^i 51 miles were then in use. 

The Sub.quehanna and Chenango rivers are spanned by seven bridges, all but one of 
which are comparatively modern and costly structures The situation of the city along th^^ 
shores of two large streams that form a junction here makes the matter of bridges. an important 
one, and the fact that the city has speni $300,733.53 in building bridges shows that she is fully 
alive to this need Here is a list of the river bridges with the cost of each: Court street bridge, 
$75,875; Ferry street, $49,339.48; Tompkins street, $38,814.29; Washington street, $38,077.87 ; 
Rockbottom bridge, $35,193.97; DeForest street, $25,238.73; Exchange street footbridge (lately 
condemned), $4,500. A new bridge is to be built in place of the one last named. These, 
together with the other bridges over small streams, have a total length of 3,404.63 feet. 



THE WATER SUPPLY 

While for several years the city water has not been pure at certain seasons, this fault will 
be done away with at once, and within a few months the residents of this city will be drinking 
water than which none better could be found in the finest mountain springs. After carefully 
considering various plans for bettering the service, the Water Commissioners, on the advice of 
an expert, have decided to install a mechanical sand filtration plant, with a daily capacity of 
8,000,000 gallons, and which, it is calculated, will remove from the water between ninety-eight 
and ninety-nine per cent, of impurities. The result will be water all the year around as clear 
and sparkling as if it had been distilled. 




Binghamton State Hospital 



The water works, which are owned by the city, are fully equipped for every emergency, 
and the service is uniform and entirely satisfactory. There are three engines — one Holly Gas- 
kell, four-cylinder, compoimd condensing, with a capacity of 12,000,000 gallons; one Holly 
Gaskell. new pattern, four-cylinder, compound condensing, with 12,000,000 gallons' capacity; 
one Holly quadruple, four-cylinder, compound condensing, capacity 6,000,000 gallons. The 
system is direct pressure, the source of sujjply being the Susquehanna river. At present the 
water is taken into wells from a crib situated above the sources of contamination from the fac- 
tories, etc., in the city. Last year 2,203,445,275 gallons were pumped, which is a daily average 
of 6,036,973. 

The financial condition of this branch of the city service is very satisfactory. It is man- 
aged by a Board of Water Commissioners, one member of which is elected annually. The de- 
partment has in the banks the sum of $113,067.70, and the outstanding bonds amount to 
$160,000. Of this amount $7,000 is to be paid this year, $gi,ooo in 1907 and $62,000 in 1918. 
Prospective residents will be interested in the water rates, which are as low as is consistent with 
good service. The principal rates are: Culinary use, per year, for each family not exceeding- 
six persons, $4; water closets, each family, $3; each additional closet, each family, $1; one 
bath-tub, family use, $3; each additional tub for same family, ,$i ; each bowl, $1 ; one set laun- 
dry-tubs in residence, ,$2 ; hand hose for sprinkling streets, etc, where the premises are not 
more than fifty feet wide, $3; where premises are more than fifty feet wide, special assessment; 
hose attached to lawn sprinkler or other device, $7. Stables: Private carriage horse, $4; each 
additional horse, $2; work horse, $2; each additional horse, $1. Offices: Three persons or less, $5. 
Stores, five persons or less, $7. No hotel, factory, livery stable, tannery, brewery or railroad com- 
pany is permitted to take the city water except thi-ough a meter. The rates range from twenty 
cents a thousand for a daily average of 1,000 gallons to five cents a thousand for a daily average 
of 20,000 to 50,000 gallons. 

EDUCATION 

Among the advantages which Binghamton can offer, not the least is her system of public 
schools, in which she takes high rank among the cities of the country. Generously provided 
for and conducted in the true spirit of modern scholarship, the schools give a practical training 
which is excelled in few cities of this size. The present head of the department, Darwin L. 
Bardwell, has a reputation among educators throughout the United States, and was recently 
called to the Pacific coast to deliver a course of lectures on educational topics. 

In addition to the High School, the Manual Training School and the Grammar School, 
there are fifteen ward schools situated in every part of the city. Many of them are new build- 
ings, fitted with every convenience, and accommodations are supplied ample for all the children 
of school age. 



i>/' 



« ^ 



>\ 




- V 



f^^n^ 






% - 






The High School, whose principal is Joseph Edward Banta, has a very capable staff of twen- 
tj^-four teachers and a total registration of 743 students. The thoroughness of its work is shown 
by the high rank that its graduates are taking at college and in life. Although the chief aim of 
the institution is not college preparatory work, the literary course is arranged to fit pupils for 
the leading colleges and universities. The other course in the curriculum is called the English 
course and requires two years of a foreign language. Both have been approved by the Hon. 
Charles R. Skinner, State Superintendent of Public Instruction. In connection with the High 
School is conducted the Barlow School of Industrial Arts, under the principalship of V. S. 
Paessler. This was given by the late Allen Barlow, and is under the direct control of a board 
of trustees which, owing to a lack of funds, is obliged to look to the public school sj'stem for 
aid. It has classes in joinery, wood-turning, spindle and face-plate turning, cooking, mechan- 
ical drawing, parallel and angular projection, forging, isothermal drawing, household manage- 
ment and household sanitation, sewing, etc. The Grammar School, of which Miss Mary E. 
Hunt is principal, is in the Washington street building. 

A Truant School is also in operation, and a supervisor of music, a supervisor of drawing 
and a supervisor of written work are also employed to look after the work in these branches in 
the various schools. 

Nothing shows a city's advancement more strikingly than the increase in registration in 
her public schools. In iSqc the total registration was 4,321. This year (1901) it is 7,002, made 
up as follows: Kindergartens, 660; first grade, 1,240; second, 775; third, 7S9; fourth, 802; 
fifth, 651; sixth, 603; seventh, 4S5 ; eighth, 254; ninth, 331; tenth, 154; eleventh, 135; twelfth, 
123. The amount appropriated by the city for the support of the schools during the year 1900- 
1901 was $i24,ot8.98, and $24,753.45 was received from the State, making a total of $[48,772.43. 
During the last fiscal year (1899-1900) $142,568.60 was expended, !|;95.69o 37 of which was for 
teachers' wages alone. Nearly every year the city has been investing more money in education. 
The amount appropriated by the City and State in 189S-99 was $140,595.67, and in 1899-1900 it 
was $140,532.56 

The City School Library, which is in the Washington street school building, had in the 
year ending August 31, 1900, i 1,773 books in its circulating library and 1,437 in the reference 
library It was open 290 days and its total circulation for the year was 67,072 These were 
borrowed by 4,502 persons. The expenditures for the year were $3, 1 71.94. The library, while 
under the control of the school department, serves the purpose of a city library, any resident 
being permitted to take books. Though, as the figures will show, it is cloing good work, under 
the supervision of Mrs Josephine Clonney, librarian, a promising movement is now under way 
to erect a separate and more adequate public library building. 

Besides the public schools, there are within the city a number of private institutions of 
learning, notably the Lady Jane Grey School for young women; St. Joseph's Academy, a Cath- 
olic school conducted by the Sisters of St. Joseph, and two commercial schools — Riley's and 
Lowell's. Many families with children to educate move to Binghamton solely for the purpose 
of securing educational advantages for them. These the city has to offer in the fullest measure. 




Bloom. CociMls ,hiil 



THE POLICE DEPARTMENT 

\'isilc)is lo the city frequently comment upon the stalwart appearance of members of the 
police force. The department is under control of a Board of Police Commissioners, who have 
alwavs shown commendable zeal in the service. The officers of the department are: Chief, 
William Moore; Assistant Chiefs, C. Burdette Abel and Charles H. Meade; Roundsman, Wil- 
liam Fredenbursj; City Detective, Robert Stephenson. 

The number of patrolmen is thirty-one. The eight-hour system is in force, havinw re- 
ceiith' been adopted after careful investig'ation. It has given general satisfaction. The force 
is divided into three shifts, who succeed each other every eight hours, so that the city is well 
protected at every hour of the day and night. The department enjoys a reputation for efficiencv, 
honesty and thoroughness. Charges of corruption are never made against it, as in many other 
cities. 




Water Works 



City offenders are tried in Police Court, presided over by a judge known as the Recorder. 
The present incumbent is S. Mack Smith. Headquarters and court occupy convenient quarters 
on the first floor of the Municipal Building. Last year 1,379 arrests were made by the police 
department. 



TRANSPORTATION 

Few inland cities are so favored in regard to transportation facilities as Binghamton. 
Its geographical location is perfect, it being situated midway between New York and Buffalo, on 
two of America's principal trunk lines, the Erie and Delaware, Lackawanna & Western. 

The New York State Capital at Albany is on the direct line of the D. & H. Company, only 
143 miles distant, and Harrisburg, the seat of Pennsylvania government, lies 191 miles to the 
south. Scranton, the heart of the anthracite coal region, is sixty-one miles away, and the bitu- 
minous coal district of Pennsylvania but ninety miles to the southwest, providing cheap fuel for 
the home and factory. 

The Syracuse and Utica divisions of the Lackawanna system radiate north from this city 
through the rich farming district to Oswego, on the shores of Lake Ontario, and the Susque- 
hanna division of the Delaware & Hudson, together with the branches of the Erie and Lacka- 
wanna running into the coal regions, reach a great consuming trade, from which the merchants 
and manufacturers of Binghamton reap many thousands of dollars annually. 

The Erie, with its many branches and lateral lines, penetrates the fertile district of 
Western Pennsylvania and Southern New York; the Lackawanna system likewise, Central and 
Northern New York, and the Delaware & Hudson Company through the Adirondack region into 
Canada, the latter line also being direct route to Boston and all New England points, so that 
from Binghamton there is no direction which cannot be reached with promptness and dispatch. 

All the passenger and freight stations here are located in the heart of the city's business 
district, the freight stations being equipped with all the modern facilities for the economical and 
rapid handling of freight, both received at and forwarded from the city. 

Seventy passenger trains depart daily. Shippersare particularly favored with quick freight 
service, owing to this city being such a large transfer point, where thousands of cars of freight 
are consolidated monthly for all points in the East and West, as well as New England; through 
car service 'has been inaugurated to all the principal cities as far west as the Mississippi river, 
enabling the Binghamton manufacturers to deliver their goods at destination ahead of their 
competitors, thereby holding and increasing their trade. A sample of the schedule time on 
package freight is twelve hours from New York to Binghamton; forty-eight hours from Bing- 
hamton to Chicago. 

The yard limits of the four roads extend for many miles on three sides of the city, switch- 
ing service is elaborate and prompt, and the charge for handling cars between the various lines 
and private sidings is nominal. 



H m 






M m 



W M! :'f 




stone Opera House, Binghamton, N. Y, 



The many miles of private sidings now in use by the various industries, and maintained 
by the different lines, is established proof of the extent to which the railroads have gone in pro- 
viding facilities for industries already located here, and should be sufficient assurance that new 
comers will be taken care of in the same generous manner. 

To all western points the same freight rates are in effect from Binghamton as from Roch- 
ester, N. Y., a point which is nearly 200 miles west, and on business from western points to 
Binghamton the same rates apply here as to Syracuse, N. Y. In other words, Binghamton 
enjoys Rochester rate basis west bound, and Syracuse rate basis east bound. 

The Street Railway system is very comprehensive, with mileage of forty miles, furnish- 
ing easy access to all factory and business districts as well as residence portions of the city. 
Both steam and electric railroad companies, through their Binghamton officials, have an excellent 
reputation for going more than half way to encourage new industries here by offering all the 
facilities at their command, which are needed from a transportation standpoint, to assist every 
concern to success. There is a large amount of desirable unoccupied land adjacent to the vari- 
ous lines which can be secured for the establishment of new industries. 



CITY'S FINANCIAL CONDITION 

The city is in a most solid condition financially, its bonds being sought after by capitalists 
who are willing to pay more than three per cent, premium on them. Tlae following statement 
of city finances at the time this book is issued is prepared by the City Clerk: 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT CITY CLERk'S OFFICE. 

Assessed valuation for 1900 $ 2 1, 109,730 00 

Real valuation, estimated 21,109,730 00 

Debt: Bonds previously issued 677,500 00 

Floating S3-3oi 4i 

This issue 1 8,000 00 

Total debt $ 74^, 8°' 4' 

Bonds issued under Chapter Si of the Laws of 1S95 and amended by Chapter 8 of the 
Laws of 1 90 1. L C. Hull, City Clerk. 

Of the assessed valuation $18,889,200 is real property and ,$2,220,530 personal. While, as 
will be noted in the City Clerk's report, property is supposed to be assessed at its actual value, 
as a matter of fact it is assessed at about two-thirds of its value. It may be said that the assess- 
ment upon industries is perhaps more reasonable than in any other city of the State, a fact 
which alone is a great inducement for manufacturers to locate here. Further information of 
great interest will be gladly furnished by the Secretary of the Board of Trade. 



This year's report and budget, recently presented to the Common Council, may be briefly 
summarized as follows: Public debt, $4,500; interest account, $19,899.84; pavement and sewer 
notes, $16,920.12; estimated expenses, $312,197.64; total, $353,517.60; less estimated resources 
other than taxes, $30,000; total amount to be raised by tax, $323,517.60. 

This makes the tax rate the same as last year, $1.52. 

Extravagance with the public moneys is one of the most fruitful sources of misfortune 
to any municipality. In Binghamton, generally speaking, a reasonable economy has usually 
been the rule and, as the figures given above will show, there is 
department. 



extravagance in any 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS AND INSTITUTIONS 

Binghamton has many attractive public buildings and institutions, which have cost over 
$2,000,000. The Binghamton State Hospital for the Insane, one of the largest in the country, 
is picturesquely situated on a hill in the eastern part of the city. Over $1,000,000 has been spent 

in the erection of buildings and 

I — equipment for this institution, in 

which over t,3oo patients are cared 
for. 

The Municipal Building, County 
Court House and United States Post- 
office and Court House are hand- 
some stone structures, each costing 
from $125,000 to $150,000. 

The city has a well-equipped gen- 
eral and emergency hospital. Over 
100 Protestant orphan children are 
cared for at tlie attractive Susque- 
hanna Valley Home, while about the 
same number of Catholic children 
receive excellent care at St. Mary's 
Home. A Central Fire Station and 
seven other attractive engine and 
hose houses furnish homes for the 
different organizations of the city 
Ely Tower fire department. 




THE PUBLIC HEALTH 

Binghamton has an active and progressive Health Department which looks after infrac- 
tions of sanitary laws rigorously. Great activity and prudence are exercised in the matter of 
quarantining cases of contagious diseases, a fact that has prevented the spread of these affec- 
' *■ " tions. It may be said that the city 



^> 



|[ ■ iii ti 



T 



~.r=E3iiK,j«Jl^jv^'' fl 1, 'i H 



r r w 



Postoffice 



is not subject to epidemics of fatal 
diseases of any sort. The number 
of deaths last year was 792, which 
gives a death rate for that period of 
about 19 97 per cent. But this is 
distinctly unfair to the city, for, be- 
cause of a general prevalence of 
sickness throughout the State, the 
number of deaths here was vastly 
in excess of any previous year. A 
computation of the deaths for a 
dozen years gives an average rate 
of 13 per cent. This very low death 
rate is despite the fact that the'Bing- 
hamton State Hospital, which has a 
population of 1,500. is included in 
the report. There were 10 1 deaths 
at that institution alone last year. 

The records of the department 
show that the following number of 
deaths have been reported each year 
since 1884: 1884, 304; 1885, 311; 
1886, 379; 1887, 431 ; 1888, 496; 1889. 
,^46; 1890, 554; 1891, 678; 1892, 685; 
1893, 622; 1894, 643; 1895, 588; 1896, 
559; 1897, 590; 1898, 669; 1899, 707; 
iQco, 792. The principal causes of 
death last year, together with the 
number of deaths caused by each, 
are as follows: Pulmonary consump- 
tion, 62; diphtheria, 51; cancer, 28; 
apoplexy, 39; dementia, 37; menin- 
gitis. 19; valvular disease of the 
heart, 34; pneumonia, 54; cholera 
infantum, 20; nephritis, chronic, 31. 



There is also a Plumbing; Board which has supervision over all plumbing done in the city. 
Applicants for plumber's certificates are very carefully examined, and no careless work is toler- 
ated in this matter of so much concern to the general health. 



COST OF LIVING. REAL ESTATE AND RENTS 



dai 
ma 



The cit 
ry product 
kers. Thi 

The CO: 



y is m 
s used 



t of li 



the center of an excellent farming section. Most of the agricultural and 
bv its inhabitants are cheaply delivered at their doors by the growers and 
Mncd with close competition between the merchants, makes cheap living, 
ving is still further reduced by the cheapness of rents, making it possible 

for factory em- 
ployes to live 
well on mod- 
erate wages. 
Binghamton is 
a city of com- 
fortable homes 
with propor- 
tiDuatelyfewer 
"shanties" 
than any city 
in the United 
States. Attrac- 
tive houses or 
Hats, with all 
modern and 
sanitary im- 
provements, 
;i r e rented 
i.'heaply. 

Binghamton 
is "large for 
its size," cov- 
er i n g more 
ground than 
most cities of 
45,000 inhabi- 
tants. Real es- 
Residence of 8- [Mills Ely. Henry Street tate values are 




accordingly moderate. Buildings for manufacturing purposes are rented cheaply; and in case 
buildings for any particular industry are not for rent, land owners are always ready to erect 
suitable buildings to rent at moderate rates. 

It may be said that rents of factory buildings and dwellings will average only twenty or 
thirty per cent, of what would have to be paid for the same accommodations in New York city. 
Manufacturers may also calculate upon a saving of about forty per cent, in wages over those 
paid in New York. Further information upon this subject will be gladly furnished by the 
Secretary of the Board of Trade. 

THE CITY'S FACTORIES 

The label, " Made in Bingham ton," is to be seen on manufactured articles offered for 
sale in all parts of the world. These goods are of all kinds, from a carpet tack to a large steam 
boiler. Some of the principal things made in the city are boots and shoes, cigars, carriages and 
sleighs, chairs and furniture, doors, sash and blinds, washing machines, hoes, glass bottles, 
scales, combs, buttons, wire goods, felting, beet sugar, harness and saddlery, boilers, electric 
dynamos and motors, flexible shafts, men's clothing, overalls, shirts, hunting jackets and canvas 
sporting goods, carriage ironing, whips, gloves, time recorders, flour, crackers, tacks, envelopes, 
folding boxes, refined wood alcohol, flavoring extracts, and rubber bicycle and carriage tires. 

For a quarter of a century Binghamton has been one of the leading cigar manufacturing 
cities in the country. About a dozen large factories and forty smaller ones last year turned out 
nearly 100,000,000 cigars, an output exceeded by only one or two cities in the Union, When 
the $10,000,000 American Cigar Company was organized last spring to operate factories through- 
out the country, it was immediately decided that three of those factories, employing 3,000 hands, 
should be located in Binghamton. These three factories have recently been started. 

About 600 persons are employed in the three large chair factories in the city. Over 200 
hands are employed in two factories making Binghamton scales, which have a world-wide repu- 
tation for accuracy and durability. Over 200 men help make carriages and sleighs. The In- 
ternational Time Recorder Company, the only firm making time recorders in this country, 
employs several hundred hands and maintains agencies throughout the world. Four large 
overall, shirt and canvas sporting goods factories employ nearly 1,000 girls and women. 

The largest shoe factory in the world is operated in Lestershire, a suburb immediately 
adjoining the city. A large proportion of the 1,800 employes of this factory live in the city 
limits. The Lestershire company is now erecting another shoe factory to employ 2,000 
hands, and the largest tannery in the world at Endicott, another suburb, which is connected 
with Binghamton by an electric car line. 

The cheapness of power is one of Binghamton's claims upon the manufacturer. A 
twenty-flve-horse power gas engine can be run for $20 a month. The attaching of a gasoline 
tank to the engine is permitted, the expense of which would not be over fifty cents a day. 
Electricity is largely used and is inexpensive, while a twenty-five-horse power engine can be run 



by steam for about $2.80 a day. The president of a company which recently came to Bingham- 
ton from New York says that it costs him less to rjtn his entire factory by gas poivcr than it ihd to 
light his offices in Nciv York. Cheap power, transportation and rent, together with compara- 
tively low' wages, puts the Binghamton manufacturer upon a basis where he can compete with 
his rivals without fear. 



TELEPHONE SERVICE 

Two telephone companies have plants here— the New York, Pennsylvania & New Jersey 
Telephone and Telegraph Company and an independent citizens' company, which will begin its 
service in a short time. Compared with many other cities rates are low, and because of the 
rivalry between the two companies they are bound to tumble away down. Already telephone 
service which in New York would cost $125 can be obtained in Binghamton for $48. 

NEW RAILROAD SHOPS 

As this book goes to press the officials of the Delaware, Lackawanna &• Western Raih-oad 
Company have selected a site and have announced their intention of at once erecting car and 
machine shops in Binghamton, because Binghamton is believed to be the best located of any 
city and to offer all ofthe desired advantages. All of the car and machine works of the com- 
pany will be centered in Binghamton, the plants being moved from Scranton, Syracuse, Utica, 
and other points. These shops will employ 2,000 men, mostly skilled mechanics. 




t!^ 0^S^t 




p. J. McTIGHE 




E. S. TRUESDELL 



J. M. DAVIDGE 



McTIGHE, TRUESDELL & DAVIDGE 

WHOLESALE GROCERS 




FAYETTE STREET 
>^ 

T-^ I OREMOST among the stable and progressive commercial enterprises of Binghamton is 
A I the wholesale grocery concern of McTighe, Truesdell & Davidge, a direct descendant 
of one of the pioneer mercantile establishments of the city. The trade of this firm covers 
an extensive field, and is large and steadily growing. Abundant capital and an exper 
ience of many years, supplemented by unsurpassed facilities for gauging the markets 
and keeping in touch with the trade, for close buying and selling and for shipping, are 
among the advantages which enable McTighe, Truesdell & Davidge to hold a com- 
manding place in the commercial life of this city and section, and these advantages are 
not more helpful to the maintenance of this concern's popularity and business prestige than the record 
for honorable dealing it has so long and so creditably sustained. No other firm has so generously or 
for so long a time contributed to the commercial stability of Binghamton, or done so much toward 
opening and maintaining the arteries for the inflow of that outside trade that has been so helpful in 
the direction of promoting the prosperity of the city. This is in no sense an advertisement for Mc- 
Tighe, Truesdell & Davidge ; they need none. Their business has been so long established, and it 
has grown to such proportions, that it continues to increase of its own force, with the aid of the 
firm's long-sustained reputation for reliability and its practical and progressive methods. In their new 
and commodious building, perfectly equipped for the convenient storing and handling of goods, and 
with switching facilities that enable them to load cars at their door, they are in a position to add to 
the other manifold advantages they are able to afford their patrons that of prompt and perfect ser- 
vice. Such an enterprise as this is necessarily stimulating to the commercial life of any community. 




T. B. CRARV, V. Pr 



D. A. SMITH, Treas. and Mflr 



Goff, Crary (Q. Smith Co. 



WHOLESALE DEALER* IN 



PIl 
tftall 



BOOTS, SHOES AND RUBBERS 

187 and 189 Water Street, Binghatnton. N. Y. 



Ml 

m 
m 



m 




V/>e Radcliife Factory Capacity 0,000 Pairs Daily 



Money Saving Distributers of Boots, Shoes, Rubbers and Findings. Our popular line of Radcliffe 
Shoes for Women retail for $2.50 and $3.00 

All leading retailers carry the Radcliffe for Women. IMade in all styles 

Our popular lines of Men's, Boys', Youth's, Women's, Misses', and Children's Shoes may be 
seen any time by sending us a card 



iillliiiiiiiilil 




YOU have a "RIGHT" business, and are looking for a "RIGHT" 
place to plant it, or transplant it; we're situated to help make ends meet. 
Binghamton is a "business" town — every way; always has been. 
And if you're built along that line 'twill be found to PAY to look up 
its points. The past, the present and the future are worthy the atten- 
tion of any live man; it's an all-round GOOD town to get in with. 

Yes, we are in the LAND business— got lots of it. But we're not 
booming it — 'tain't the "boom" kind. Been waiting till the "right" 
thing came along to "hit" it; nothing else will. And it's likely exactly 
what YOU'VE been dreaming about: the sort of situation to suit your needs. 
Ample acreage adjoining the Susquehanna, level as a floor and within a mile- 
radius of the city's center; with a new $40,000 bridge crossing to principal street; 
with a projected D. L. & W. switch; with convenient street car service; and with 
select, high ground Home Sites near by, free of saloons. 

Certainly a rare chance, if— yes, if — the "RIGHT" thing happens along; 
and we're watching the road every day. But conditions arc about to change — 
perhaps before this book leaves the press. Only early action will count. 

South End Land Company, "Arena," Binghamton, New York, will fetch 
further information, any time, anywhere. Want it? 



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^EKIKDOFBAITYOUUSE 

Ma|ig a^di)jerei\ce ir\wlvz\Jyou C2\jcl\. 
IFYOUWANT TO CATCH BUSINESS 

YOU WE 
MUST MAKE 

USE THE 

CUTS. BEST. 

ALL PROCESSES. 

ELECTROTYPING 



SJICLLEY ENG.C 



301-5 WATLR ST, 





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CLARKE & FISHER LOCATION 






THE most Beautiful Home Sites in the 
Entire City are in the Clarke & Fisher 
Location; they are only 8 to 10 minutes 
walk from the Court House; they lay 
directly in front of the new $50,000.00 
Bridge at Exchange Street. There has 
been more Modern, Up-to-date Buildings built in 
the last two years on this plot than all the rest of the 
City combined. We will build you a House after 
your own plans and let you pay for it by the month 



96 Conklin Ave. 



CLARKE & FISHER 



Binghciniton, [M. Y. 



:f^ 



||||$||||$iii$ilii|ii|i$$$||$||$||||$|||$f 



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CROPPER & STAFFORD 



«^ DEALERS IN^O 



GAS FIXTURES 



Plumbers, Gas Fitters 
Sanitary Engineers 

178 and 180 "Water Street 

BINGHAMTON, N. Y. 



Estimates Furnished 



•PHONE 349 K 



^hQ FINEST 



\ O. I. BATES 

l^au^dry 

\ 115 Court Street, Binghamton, N. Y. 
9 ^he LARGEST 



J. C. GOAL, President W. F. MESSNER, Vice-President L 

S. T. MESSNER, Treasurer \ 



TIONfl OIL GO. 

BINGHAMTON, N. Y. 

Lubricating Oils and Greases 
Gasolines, W. W. 1 50 

SUB-STATIONS 

TROY and UTICA, N. Y. 



J. VICTOR 8CHAD 

FIRE - LIFE - ACCIDENT 

..INSURANCE. 



^ 



Cor. Henry and State Streets P 

15 ACKERWAN BUILDING BINGHAMTON, N. Y. \ 



^^^^^^^^^Sl^^S^^^&^^^^^^^l 



M 



LESTERSHIRE 
LUMBER ®. BOX CO. 

-^ ^ LUMBER -<^ -^ 

Boxes and Mill WorK 

LESTERSHIRE. N. Y. 






i^fl^iC;]' 



Highest Grade of 

TELEPHONE SERVICE 

furnished 

at Reasonable Rates 

LONG DISTANCE 

LINES 

covering Thirty-five States 

and the 

Dominion of Canada, 

in which one-half million 

Telephone Subscribers 

can be reached 

Modern Equipment 

and 

Facilities for furnishing 

EXCHANGE SERVICE 

on 

Short Notice 



THE 

NEW YORK 

AND 

PENNSYLVANIA 
TELEPHONE 

AND 

TELEGRAPH 
COMPANY 



OFFICES, 173-177 STATE STREET 

BINGHAMTON 



NEW YORK 



BINGHAMTON 

Is the recognized trade center of the Southern 
Tier counties of the Empire State. Its city 
population of 40,000 — which is increasing 
rapidly — is supplemented by a thriving, in- 
telligent, well-to-do country and surburban 
population of many thousand more. The 

Bin gHamton 
Republican 







Is the only Morning Daily Newspaper in its field. It has the full report of the 
Associated Press, is bright and reliable in news and editorial and it practically 
has no competitor. Its 

Job Department 

Is the best equipped of any to do Up-to-Date, Artistic Book and Job Work and 
do it promptly and satisfactorily in price Modern presses, new type faces, 
including the latest improved Mergenthaler Machines for rapid and beautiful 
work. Estimates cheerfully furnished. 

BINGHAMTON REPUBLICAN, BingHamton. N. Y. 



The Oldest 

Established 

House 

In the City 



Three 

Minute's Walk 
From the 
Depots 



All Modern 
Improvements 
Gas, Electric 
Lights 
Elevator 
Steam Meat 



Rates 
$2.00 a Day 



mt^ 










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^iypaiilliMil ffiiliiill ill illlMli 



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LEWIvS HOUvSE 



AVM. SHANUY, Prop. 



QUARTERED OAK 



E. C. SMITH 

Wholesale and Retail 

LUMBER 



,',,., 



'""^ z/'^- •;.,,',!'■ V. '■■.'-• LUMBER 
^^=-5^. ^/ 1 '^/ ^<yi^:: 'MILL WORK 



. . Fine Interior Finish A Specialty 

ESTIMATES CHEERFULLY GIVEN 
Office and Yards, 4J Clinton Street 

BINGHAMTON, N. Y. 




fhis is a tae simile 
of the package 



" A Kiss anil a Drinl^ of Water 
Makes but a Poor Breakfast. 



Yes, but a kiss and a 
Cup of our Coffee not 
only refreshes " the 
inner man," but trans- 
forms the plainest 
meal into a veritable 
feast. 



This Coffee is 

ROASTED 
BLENDED 
P AC K ED^ 

And Sold by 



H, W, CHUBBUCK & CO, i 

BINGHAMTON, N. Y., U. S. A. | 




UeCancei 1/ >ii^ Rchion >I S\steni f 

' New « "'*'^^thb C,||.p a, BUNCHLi n ji' 

lien « Tu„op,s «■ sure w growths La^y ^ 

Exlernal and InternnI dps1r(i>ine Women Menard? 

: Children Noburninj plislLfs o li X ray electric-? 

now for trealmenl, or address fs 




AL Kh 



Mountaii 



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"(iV^' -•'■'"■ 



16 eldridge: street 

•PKone 206 



Weir (^ Sullivan 
I Real Estate: 

m 

Q Special Bargains^^ Offered ii\ Improved Realty 

^ MORTGAGES FOR SALE 

BINGHAMTON. N. Y. 



Rooms 607, 668 and 66Q 

THE O'NEIU BUILDING^ 



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^^Bre-. jl^^^ 



C. H. MITCHl LL, I2H LrRoy St., 'Phone 



MITCHELL 




D. D. STEVER, 3 North Ave., 'Ph^ 




Estimates 
Cheerfully 
Furnished 



CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS 



Telephone 



Office, QT-OO COLLIER STREET 



BINGHAMXON SAVINGS BANK BLDG 















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6.&G.M«KlNNEY, 






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(Oualito 



A Winter 8( c-ne at Hopton's Meat Market. 108 Court Street 

£. F. -HnptCU, H'l-oprictoi- 



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CROCKER cf OGDEN 



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MiKLPs p,AXK r.Lir.DiNG B[X(; II A M'i< )X, Nkw ^■ol{lv 



HARDAYARE | 

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DELAWARE Hudson 

(pAl-BiNGHflMTON.N.Y 




FOR IX BEACH e POWELL 



soi.i; .\(;i'.\i-^ roH riii: 



Delaavahi: cS: Hudson CompanvV Genuine 
LACKAWANNA COAL 

rilK SUPKHIOK (JLAMTV OF I'lIK I). .V II. COAL IS WHAT HAS MAKK 

riiis i-.LsixKss rm: i.ahokst in iiik city 



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J. R. LYNCH & SON 



A Charles D. Mlddlebrook 



86 STATE ST. 



Charles F. Mlddlebrook A 



G. D. MiddleDrook & Son 



(Established 1855) 



Manufacturers of 



Sheet Metal Goods 




Cornices, Skylights, Gutters, 

Conductor Pipes, 
Ridging, Finials and Weatlier Vanes 



Largest and Best Stock of Seasoned *;! 
White Pine, Whitewood and Yellow Pine 'X 



e>V\^ 



...LUMBER... 



vVa^ 



Under Cover, Dressed and Ready for I|! 
Immediate Use ..* ^ j^ j* ^* ^* X 



Doors. Windows and Blinds 
Hemlock Timber and Uiimber 
SHiPQles. Latli, Ladders. Etc.. Etc. 



STATE ST., Corner of Lewis 

Near an the Depots Bi NGHfl M TON. N . V . 



Cbe Binahamton Ccadcr 



There is a leading newspaper in every city. In Binghamton, it's 
The LEADER: The only afternoon paper in the southern tier of 
New York and the northern tier of Pennsylvania a member of the 
Associated Press. Leading in news, in advertising and circulation 



The WANT COLUMNS are the popular medium of Want Advertisements for the City 



Delivered by Carriers*^ 25 Cents a MontK 



the Democratic (Ucekly Dader 

PublisKed THursdays jZ^ j£^ $1.00 a Year 



Ccadcr Publisblng Co* ^ BingbSmton'mw vork 








' Just a Few of XHer 



L. J. RINGSLEY 

d Carriage MaRers' S\xf>f 
All Kinds j£f £? ^ 

BINGHAMTON, N. Y. 



WKolesale 'Wagon and Carriag'e MaRers' Supplies 

j£/ j£/ jSf Of All Kinds jZ/ jEf ^ 



SHEAR. ST 




FANCY PLYMOUTH 
RED ASH COAL 

VERY HARD AND BRIGHT 

More Heat Less Ashes Less Bother 

than any other anthracite coal 



<?&) 

sy 







Blanchard & Company 

73 PROSPECT AVE. BINGHAMTON. N. Y. 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL ANTHRACITE AND BITUMINOUS COAL 



That Farm 




Where we keep our Jersey 
Cows, that produce the rich 
milk with which our Bread 
and Cakes are made, has done 
much to build up our business. 

We are now enlarging our 
Baking Department, putting 
in another oven, to keep pace 



ith 



our Qrowinc 



busi 



ness. 




OA 



121 

COURT 

ST 






FX,o,„ r ^''^ Elevator Co 




GfyMN' fuOUP>M|LL FEED. 



^INGHAf 



EMPIRE GRAIN AND ELEVATOR CO. 

SHIPPER* OF GRAIN, FLOUR AND MILL FEED 

Binghamton Elevator Capacity 40,000 Bu. J*Jt Binghamton Warehouse Capacity 5,000 Tons 

Anuuai Sales . . . $1,000,000.00 

Fancy, Natural ar>d Clipped Oats a Specialty 

MILLERS' AGEMS FOR WASHBURN, CROSBY & CO.S CELEBRATED GOLD MEDAL FLOUR 
I . M. WILSON, Treasurer and Manager T. H. WILSON, Associate Manager 



^ 



Operate over 

D. L.&W. R. R. 

ERIE R. R. 

LEHIGH VALLEY R.R. 

N. v., 0. & W. R. R. 
anil their 
connections 




^ 




We "Would Appreciate a 
SKare o/ Your 

fire 
Insurance 



Our Agency is tHe Oldest 
in BingHatnton 

R.epresenting a Number 
of tKe Oldest and Most 
Keliable Companies in 
the Business 



Bo$$ ^ ]one$ 



Oia Office of 
BOSS, JTTOPPARD CSi, HECOX 



BOX TRADERS' a Specialty 



EARL D. 08TR0M 



AVHOLESALE 

and 

RETAIL 



Qgars 



'PKone 316 B 



82 Court St. 



Proprietor-^?- CIGA.R STA.NDS 

Hotel Bennett and The Arlington 



69 1 -2 Court St. Binghamton, N. Y. 

■VBNavJRS/V 









Cbc Bingbamton Savings Bank 






Incorporated 

APRIL 18, 1867 




Cbe €ity of Bingbantton 



Incorporated 

APRIL 9, 1867 



They Have Grown Up Together 

Substantial Solid Progressive 



.^w*=,<The Bank has paid its Depositors over $1,100,000 Interest on its 
Deposits and has been largely instrumental in furnishing money to build our 
Water Works, Bridges, School Houses, Hospitals, Etc. j* ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 

Deposits Received from s cts to $3,000 



ASSETS $2,954,717 

WM. H WILKINSON, 
President 



MONEY TO LEND 

CHAS. W. GENNET, 
Treasurer 




PERSELS & MACK 



MA^UFACTURERS OF 



HARNESS 



Jobbers of Saddlery Hardware 



40 CHENANGO STREET 



BINGHAMTON, N. Y. 



IfessSJ 



E. H. TITCHENER (El CO. 



ated < 



THE plant of E. H. TItchener & Co. Is I 
the buildings are of brick. This hi 
that were maklnti Blind Staples 1 
merclal Ave. buildings, and makin 
himself and E. H. TItihener. The firm tl 
41 Whitney St. This place was occupied for th( 
[Mos. 198 and 200 Slate Street. In the start th 
the whole building, as well as two floors of No 
larged line Ini luded Staples of all varieties. D 



^t Avenue, Nos. 6 to lb. About ( 
1881 by the late F. A. tloag. 
1oag continued the business, occi 
I year to year, until 1886. when a 
ni Kingman S, Sturtevant In the bric 
hen Hoag and TItchener moved to I 
■|rm occupied quarters on the three upper floor 
196 State St. During all this time the business 
Pointed Tacks. Wire Nails and Wire Shapes . 



Spring Fore: 
s started In 

i small way. Mr. 

ome Increase fron 
ted quarters frr 



ipylng i 



I in C<- 



In the latter designation were Wire Handles for Fruit Baskets, In which a large business has been done. 



partnership l 
^ and wood buildings 
he, then new, McKlrui 
i of this building, but 
was gradually extend 
■scrlptioM 







In 1890 Edward Harris was admitted as a member of the firm and the business was conducted for tv 
of the Binghamton Wire Goods Co. About this time the firm commenced manufacturing: Ornamental Wire W 
Hce Railings, Window Guards and all kinds of light wire work for Interior and exterior use. Mr. Hoag die 
quentlv, his Interest was purchased by the late Charles Davis. From 1892 the business has been carried o 
of E. H. TItchener & Co. The same lines as originally made are still being manufactured, besides which an 
being done In Wrought Iron Metal Work for architectural purposes. This Includes Bank-Ralllnys, Steel Elev 
and Gates, Iron Stairways, Fire Escapes, Grille Work, etc. In 1899 the firm purchased the property knowr 
Works on Spring Forest Avenue. A large sum was expended In remodeling and Improvine the buildings, and 
complete and well-arranged factory, exceptionally adapted to the purposes of manufacturing. 

The Hrm of E. H. TItchener & Co. has only recently turned over the business to a Corporation of the same name of which th 
following are the officers : Edmund H. TItchener, Pres't and Treas. ; Edward Harris, VlcePres't, and Benson R. Runyon, Sec'y. 



jrs under the title 
This included Of- 
1891, and, subse. 
der the firm name 
Hsing business Is 
Cars, Iron Fences 
the Meaglev Soap 
jrs will now find a 



manufdcturers fine Cigars 



THEIR LEADING BRANDS ARE 



Crawford 
El Indio 
El Solitario 
Tuxedo 



5^ 



Hummeirs Perfecto j ^ ^ 
Triple Alliance ^ I IIC 

West End ) ^ ^ 



M — ''^~'M. 

i HUMMELL & CO. - 

•^ 410-412-414 CHENANGO ST. 

$^ BINQHAHTON, N.Y. 

*^ 

^^ 
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-^ 
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l$$$$$$l$ll$$l$$l$$$$ll$l$$lll$$$i 



# 








HE Brandt Tailoring- is equipped to accomplish most satisfying results for 
I the man who is particular about his clothes. The old-time tradition of 

X goodness and careful workmanship, which we have learned during the 

past years, still set the quality standard for every piece of work we do. 
But every new idea that has developed for making better, or better look- 
ing clothes, has been quickly applied. The best and latest woolens are 
picked out, one pattern at a time, with the most careful discrimination 
and expert taste, with fullest knowledge of what fashion has suggested 
for the season. The making is done by the most skillful tailors, after 
styles that are faultless, as well as particularly smart and graceful. The fit must be 
absolutely satisfactory ; but criticism of the garments made by us is extremely rare. 
We are more zealous about a perfect fit that shall do honor to our organization, 
than our critical customer can be. 

..*-."*This business appeals most strongly to the man who wants particular attention 
in the making of his clothes ; but who wishes to pay only the fair price for them. 
In fabrics, style and workmanship Brandt Tailoring is above criticism, yet prices are 
a little more than ready-made. 

..'' J* Visitors are welcome to come in any time and look around. Our prices arc 
marked in plain figures and experienced salesmen ready to wait upon you. 









bailor . 



]f. M. Brandt ...K-)fn>amst. 



CHARLES DIBBLE 



FURNISHING 



Funeral Director 




303-305 CHENANGO ST. 
BINGHAMTON, N. Y. 



TELEPHONE 



JUDSON S. NEWING 

Jtmkrm 
O pticians 

WATCHES, DIAMONDS, JEWELRY, 
SILVERWARE, CUT GLASS 

^' 

EYES EXAMINED FREE 

LENSES GROUND TO ORDER ON 

SHORT NOTICE 

^^ 

Repair (Uork of Jill Descriptions 

PROMPTLY DONE 

86 COURT STREET 
BINGHAMTON, NEW YORK 



iNa»>.BNBNaNasBSB'>«NBvaNa'>'>B^a^>'>'^*^ 



C. C.JACKSON. Pres. 

DR. F. E. TAFT, Vice-Pres. 



a. O. KAEPPEL, Sec. 

O. S. HELLER. Treas. and Mgr. 



Binghamton Cold Storage Co. 



COLD STORAGE AND FREEZINCi 




(OLD 1j- 




CAPACITY 200 CAR LOADS 



Finest Equipped Plant in the State 



281=287 WATER STREET 



BINQHAMTON, N. Y 




m 

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m 



BINGHAMTON. N. Y. 

Sales Agent, New YorR State and Canada, 

FOR. 

BERWIND-WHITE COAL MINING COMPANY'S 

e:uri:ra 






AND OTHER. 



pi HigH-Grade Bituminous Coals 



m 

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For Steam Generating 
and General Manufacturing' Purposes 



PREPARED SMITHING COAUS-^ A Specialty 



"JACRvSON MINE" 
True Georges CreeK Cumberland 



BINGHAMTON, N. Y. 



WALTER R. MILLER & CO. 

The Leading Stationers 

and Sole Aflents In Blntihamton and Vicinity for the 

Globe Wernicke Elastic 
Bookcase 

and 

Elastic Filing Cabinets 

This House occupies a large four story building and basement 
full of goods In their line. They sell everything In Stationery, 
Blank Books and Office Supplies. If not carried in stock, will 
order, or have made to order, anything that may be required. 

82-84 State Street Binghamton, N. Y. 



S. MASON ELLIOTT 



vS. M. i:lliott (d. CO. 




•oMClI'Iott &C0. 



0' 



Wholesale 

COAL. COKE. CHARCOAL 

MonUiomery and Frederick Streets, Binghamton. N. V. 



Picturesque Trunk Line of America 



ERIE 



THE OLD RELIABLE" 



Solid Vestibuled Trains 

CONSISTING OF SLEEPING CARS, DINING AND CAFE CARS 
AND DAY COACHES, BETWEEN 

NEW YORK, BINGHAMTON, ELMIRA, CORNING, HORNELLSVILLE, 

ROCHESTER, BUFFALO, JAMESTOWN, CLEVELAND, 

CINCINNATI AND CHICAGO 



Must Comfortable Roiite to Thk West 



D. I. ROBERTS 
Genera! Passenger Agent. NEW York 



Trains Everywhere Protected by Block Signals 



W. G. MacEDWARD 

Division Passt-nger Agent. Elmira, N. Y. 





■ N establishment that is extensively engaged in the manufacture of patent euvelopes for mailing purposes, 
is that of The Commercial Envelope Company. Limited, of this city, whose factory is on Jarvis street, 
„ the Lackawanna Railroad This Company was incorporated on April 13, 1891, under the laws of 
New York State, and its subsequent career has been of the most prosperous character. It has paid in 
dividends to its original stockholders 68 per cent. : the large trade that has been developed for its pro- 
ducts extends all over the United States, Canada, England. Brazil and South Africa. The envelope is used ex- 
tensively for mailing books, catalogues, samples of dry goods, seeds and merchandise of all kinds at a reduced 
rate of postage. The Company own patents on the Reversible, Open End and Bellows Envelopes that are made 
in all the various sizes required for l)usiness, which are of ingenious design and of indispensable utility to those doing 
business through the mails. The factory, which is .=i(i x i:;(t, two floors, is eciuipped with all the latest improved 
machinery which has been constructed and built by the Company. The Company, when first incorporated, located 
in very small ijuarters at 23 University Place, New York. In two years' time these quarters were found too 
small to accommodate our steadily increa,sing business and we moved into larger and more commodious quarters 
which we found at !)T Sixth Ave., New York. At this place the Company grew until it had acquired all the 
room that could be had in the block during the seven years we were located there. On July 2«, isys, we moved 
into our present (juarters on Jarvis street in Binghamton. At the present time we have outgrowni our .juarters 
and are figuring on a factory more than double its size. 
The officers of the Company are as follows : 



Chas. E. Lee, Treasurer 



Ben.j. B. McFadden, Pre.sident and Manager 
John Anderson, Vice-President 



R. B. LocKWOOD, Sec'y 



Board of Directors 
BEN..T. B. McFadden John Anderson Chas. E. Lee 

J. C. Hover 



R. B. LocKwooD 



Fred H. Haskins 



C. C. Pratt 




-»=^!«<_ , 



^rA 







UOWNS AVENUE 



Several Desirable Factory Sites and 150 Choice Building I^ots 
for Sale at Reasonable Prices and Easy Terms 



F. >V. DOVV^NS^ 



^' 



PHFLPS BLOCK 



BEAN ca CO. 



® 



Ulhoksak 6roc(r$ 



tea Tmporter$ and £offee Roasters 




BINGHAMTON, N. Y 










ARTISTIC WALL DECORATIONS 



Our stock embraces all grades from the 
Cheapest Blank to the Finest Hand-Made 
Papers, in addition to our American line 
we show a large assortment of Imported 
Wall Papers. 

We also show a line of Wall Fabrics, 
such as Burlaps, Linens, Satin Damasks, 
Cretonnes, Tapestries, Etc. 

We make a Specialty of Interior Deco- 
rating, Fresco and House Painting. 



A. D. Van Sciver, 90 State Street 

A. S. Cleveland & Co. 
COMMISSION MERCHANTS 

AND JOBBERS OF 

Fruit, Produce 



Oysters 



CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITED 



X 219 WASHINGTON ST., BINCHAMTON , N. Y. 



Our PRICES are RIQHT on 

ELECTRICAL WORK 

Supplies of All Kinds 
Private Line Telephones, Etc. 

BINGHAMTON 
ELECTRICAL CONSTRUCTION CO. 

160 STATE STREET 

H. M. QITCHELL 

Wholesale Dealer 

WINE.S and LIQUORS 



158-160 Washington St. 

Telephone BINGHAMTON, N. Y. 




J. f . RILEY, A. M , FOUNDER AND PF?INCIPAL 

BINGHAMTON SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 

(incorporated) 



THE BINGHAMTON 

vSCHOOL OF 
BUSINEvSvS u^ 



Is a strictly high-grade Business train- 
ing school. 



^ 



^*The business and professional men 
Invariably patronize it when in need 
of Stenographers, Bookkeepers and 
other office assistants. 



^ 



..*The school quarters occupy about 
bOOO square feet of space at 120 State 
Street. The institution has a commo- 
dious elevator for the use of students 
and the office is connected by private 



W, J. HASKINS & CO, 

142 Court St., Binghamton, N. Y. 

' ) 



NURSERYHEN 



•}• pj^tabllshed by J. H. Mason In 1878 

X J. H. Mason & Son, 1889 E. R. Mason since 1890 

E. R. MA50N 

OPTICIAN-^ 




*:; Also dealers in all kinds of Farm and Garden 
X Seeds. Seeds are positively fresh and of the 
*:* highest grades grown J* J* J* -'* <^ <•■* 

♦ WRITE FOR CATALOQUE 




69 COURT ST. 

BINGHAMTON, N. Y. 



Any one not able to read this fine print 
clearly at I 2 inches from the eyes should 
consult an optician: 



W.J. HASKINS & CO. 



% B"/6c Most Complete Mamifacturine 
% Optical Plant in tKe City j£/ £f j£f 



F. L. SHELDON, Pres't and Manager 



C. V. SHELDON, Treasurer 



The Sheldon Mfg. Co. 

BINGHAMTON, NEW YORK 



Manufacturers of 



'M/v\" 



"PERFECTION" 



\^W^ 



Foot Balls, Striking Bags, 

Hunting ClotHing, Leggins 

And E^cinipmerkisj^je^^^j^ 



.7#v¥j 





Basket Ball 



Rugby Ball 



At>J>oi idtion Ball 



«;V. nl U. S. STEVENS, JR 

•^.^ 

^j Stevens & Seaman 

^i Livery and.^ 
^ vSales Stables 




'?^V-|I] Tel 

Sllllllllllllllll 



Shoes Shined Free 31 COURT ST. 

Is. J\^ j\. j\~. J\^ J\t~. ^ ^ ,4^ ^- ^ -jl^ - 

ji i ji i|i ^{i iji ^ ifi ^ ifi i{i :|: ifi i 



m 



DIAMONDS ^ CUT GLASS 



^ ^< After years of careful study and the hand- 

^ ling of large numbers of precious gems, we 

^j can now with all truthfulness state that we 

j^j are the leading and most responsible Diamond 

^! house in Binghamton. We have expert's 

^! knowledge of Diamonds. All stones are bought 

^^i for cash and every stone is guaranteed to be as 

^j represented. We have hundreds of loose stones 

^j to select from, representing different shapes 

^\ and cuttings. All .stones set and mounted by 

h^j expert workmen who make a specialty of this 

^j work. Mountings of the newest and latest 

^: designs constantly in stock. 

^\ 

^j ^^.^In Sterling Silver we carry a general and fine line manufactured by io^ 

^1 Gorham's Manufacturing Co. and the Whiting Manufacturing Co., together ;^ 

^! with other makes. Our general stock of Watches, Clocks, Hollow and Flat J5^ 

^i Ware will be found complete in their several lines. j^ 

J. M. HENWOOD (^ CO. j^ 



."'Being direct representative agent 
for one of ttie largest manufaclurerers 
we are able to show Ifie most com- 
plete assortment of Cut Glass possible. 
For years this house has had the repu- 
tation of not only manufacturing the 
finest quality, but of placing on the 
market the most novel and exquisite 
shapes and cuttings. Te are able to 
offer these goods at wholesale prices. 
It will repay anyone to visit our store 
and see these beautiful pieces of glass. 



if 

m 
m 









Ices 






m. 

m 



W\ 

m 

m 

^! 

m 

m\ 



li 

i! 

OSEOOD e)CALt Co- 



INGHAMTON. 




UNITED STATES 



EstablisKed 





''m 



i^ 






AND ALL 

FOREIGN-^ 
STANDARDS 



i 









iii^^ii^^^^^^^^^ii^^ii^5?^i 



'/?x->fl^>ri^:/f 



ytl^ 



gTsTInorx H ] 



Wholesale Provision Dealer 



ISO SXAXE STREET 

The oldest concern in this particular line of business in the city. Established 25 years ago 
The Best Line of Goods Handled 

Vv'. T". CORNELL 

Funeral Director MMDalnifiP 




1 1 240 Gtienanoo Si Bingymion. N. y. J | 



CULHANE (Si GREEN 



Tunilture ^ Carpets « Upholsteries 



These Three Are Our Specialties 

Every Department of this Mammoth establishment abounds in the Season's Newest 
and Swellest Designs. We shall be pleased to have you drop in while shopping 
whether or no you intend to buy. 

CULHANE: ca GREEN 




PAINT MISTAKES 

If you want to iivoiil mistakes in paintiny 
tome to us. 

We have the right paint for each purpose. 
Each paint is made suitable for certain sur- 
faces and best results depend upon getting 
the right paint in the right place. 

U/ye SherAvin-AVillianis Pairits 

are all good. Each one is the best for the 
purpose that can be made. 

The best of men, materials and methods are 
in every can. 

U/)e Lawrence Paint Co. 

84 CxcKan^e St. Bing'Katnton, N. Y. 




BBNNETT ca RE:NNEDY 



.DEALERS IN... 



COAL, WOOD, COKE AND CHARCOAL 



131 >VALNUT STREET 



Jennett*}^nedy 






.''"co^^^„o»co'JJ,<„ 




^GHAMTON NY. |3|WALNUT3T 



THE establishing of lliis business dates to 1871 under dirertion of Abel Bennett, deceased, and 
was continued by him for four years, when |V1r. Butler becoming associated therein, they to- 
gether conducted its operations until 1893, at which lime the establishment was acquired by 
the late Fred Bennett and \V. P. Kennedy and operated by them to time of Mr. Bennett's decease, 
since which time it is in charge of |V1r. Kennedy as surviving partner. The trestle and pockets were 
rebuilt and enlarged eight years since and have a capacity of five thousand (5000) tons, which it is the 
management's rule to keep well stocked; customers consequently have not been inconvenienced by 
short supply at critical times. The storage room gives opportunity to discriminate as to quality in 
purchases by the firm and also to hold stock in case of arriving in wet state until dry, thus insuring 
perfect separation from dust in screening. By reason of these facilities, central west side location 
and personal integrity of those connected therewith, this business has received a gratifying patron- 
age, steadily increasing, proportionate to growth of city naturally tributary to its location. 



Cbc nineteen Rundrcd masbcr €o. 

MANUFACTURERS OF THE CELEBRATED 



1900" WASHERS AND WRINGERS 



Cbc nineteen Rundrcd lUashcr Go. 



Binghamion, new Vork 




h. l.i- -.Licccssfiil. It is tlie ivcryday help savirs that 
|,i.,w Ihe most prnfitalile in the inventive line. Any- 

tinn- that cinikl relieve in the least degree the drudgery 
o; wash day in one honselloUl would lie sure to find a 
welcome reception in the thonsamls and hundreds of 
thonsands of homes throughout the land. 

The Nineteen Hundred Washer Company has tome 
alont with a niaehin.- that relieves this drudgery in all 
well regulated houscdiolds. It is a unique inver^tion inso- 
iinicli that the principle upon wdiich it works is radical- 
Iv differ.nl from anything hefore attempted. 

The diflfcrencc might he told in a few lines. The other 
machines more a.lapled for steam i.ower th n wonin's 
rounded arms, forced the clothes through the water. The 
Kjoo Washer works water girough the clothes. It is the 
tub that moves, the washhoard is upside down. 

The clothes are constantly changing, exposing all parts 
to the ruhhin^! surfaces and the meclianical action of the 
water. There- is n,. possible eliauce to injure the most 
ilclicate fahric and in this alone it saves its cost in a 
short time. 

The tuh sets, or ratller is balanced, like the seat part 
ot a revolving chair with the difference that the bear- 
ings uiion which this machine turn are as jierfect as 
those of a hundred dollar bicycle and will last a life time. 
To make it work as nearly automatic as possible it is pro 
vided with two oil tempered coil s]irings which liel|. to 
reverse the motion. 



Ii.'inrl ll 
c baud 


.11 rocks the 
th.lt rules 111 


cradle 
■ world." 


that 111. 

;d...r r.- 


v.-s this wa 
piir.-.l for .11 


e than tl 



cbibl can operate it. The ladv sits while using it. It 
makes washing like plav work. 

Its work is so effective that it will wash any g.irm.-iit 
clean without boiling, without .scrubbing, with" it tin- 
lea.st wear and tear and without the use of .lestnum. 
cliemicals. It washes the finest fabrics without breaking 
a thread and will wash a carpet with case. In every 
respect it is a high grade, easy running family washing 
machine; does any work that can be done by hand, bet- 
ter, quicker, easier. 

The "iQoo" washer is made of the best materials 
throughout. The tub is Virginia white cedar, hooped 

with galvanized wire. These boons are embedded by a 
prtented process into grooves and are electric welded. 
There is no stretching when the tub sw^ells or dro|iping 
off when the tub is drv. The tub revolves on a perfect 
ball bearing mechanism. The machine is well made as 
it can be. 

During the three years since its introduction the 
.\ineteen Hundred Washer company has sold 50.000 ma- 
chines, besides a large number of igoo wringers and 
stands. The machine'" is a warm favorite whereever m- 
shipments have been made to foreign 



far 



untr 



Me 



Belg 



.\nstralia. 



England 



. .._ nf this company deserve large credit for 

their energetic efforts in pushing this industry. They 
are: President. T. B. Crary; vice president and secrc- 
tarv, l^ W. Welsh; treasurer. R. F. Bieber. 

i\1r. r.ieber is general manager of the business, in 
which he is ably assisted by Mr. Doane Cafferty, as ac- 

"'Vhe" Nineteen Hundred Wasliel 
g nized in i8g7 and since that time 

phenomenal, the faetorv on Clinton sti.-.l i^ 11. .u linii 
ing out about 100 machines per .lav. .\ii ,,.Ii1iI...h is i„,n 
being hiiill which will double the capaciu. Kiaiuli of 
fices are established in all the leading cities ,,f Ihisc.uulrv 
and several foreign ones; nnt.ahly. .-Vntwerp. Relgium, 
Madri.l, Spain, and the City of Mexico. The mail depart 
mint is also an important one. 



THE GREAT RAIR 



y^' , 1^?^'^ 







2-4-6 COURT ST. 



BINOHAMTON, ^. Y. 



W. D. McCULLOUGH 

F -^^-^^^^ 




— >> 




PRACTICAL « PLUMBER 

GAS AND STEAM FITTER 

Binghamton, N.Y. 

Telephone 2b2-4 



..^E^MVX 






COMPA 






Losses Fairly Adjiistccl and Promptly Paid 



_^ • f ■ " MONUMENTAL 

;6' 






^-^.-i^.t-^^Vii., 



Estimates Given on all kln.ls of Cemeterv Work 



TR.oE^c.s. &COJ:; 



CRANDAU STONE & COHPANY 

Established 1870 Incorporated J895 

CHAS n. STONE, Pres. WM. H. STONE, Vice-Pres. 

C. E. TITCHENER. Sec'y F. S. TITCHENER, Treas. 



rianufacturers of the Pioneer Brand 

CARRIAGE TRIMMINGS AND HARDWARE 

FOR DOMESTIC AND EXPORT TRADE 



ANNUAL CAPACITY, MATERIALS FOR 300,000 TOP VEHICLES 



THE PIONEER BRAND CARRIAGE HARDWARE 
HAS BEEN THE STANDARD OF THE MARKET FOR THIRTY YEARS 



FACTORY LOCATED ON UPPER COURT STREET ABOVE WATERWORKS 



TKe Largest Stock of Plumbing Material, Gas and J 
Electric Fixtures, Furnaces, Stoves, R.ang'es and House J 
FurnisKing Goods between New York and Buffalo 



Exclusive Agents for 

FAVORITE 
STOVES AND RANGES 

-? 

STERLING 

STOVES AND RANGES 

<<» 

PEASE FURNACES 

>? 
KEL8EY FURNACES 




,■ i mi RANGES^ I: ;.„ -^^--^ 
-''• '*> KITCHEN FURNISHINGS 




iHEATlNCr''^ 






,^c, 



STRANSHY ENAMELED 

WARE 

-? 

WILKE TILE-LINED 

REFRIGERATORS 

ZANESVILLE 

STONE FILTERS 

V 

ETC., ETC. 



Depth 127 ft.. Width 57 tt. 



A Complete Line of KitcHen Furnishings, Including' 
jS^ .£^ Many Novelties for the Kitchen JZ^ j^ 

Vapor Stoves Garden Hose Filters 

Blue Flame Oil Stoves Lawn Movvers Refrigerators 

Oil and Gas Heating Stoves Water Coolers Woodenware 

Gas Ranges and Hot Plates Ice Cream Freezers Stove Repairs, etc. 

McManamy ^ Rodman 



39-41 CKenango St. 



BingKamton, N. Y. 



JAME5 vS. CARY 

....MANUFACTURER OF.... 

Working Clothing, Overalls, Etc. 

DOES BUSINESS UNDER THE NAME OF FREEMAN OVERALL CO. 



THIS is the i)iont/er couipiuiy in its line of business in this city. It canvasses and manufactures^ ex- 
clusively for the .iobbinu' trade, anil has a clientage extending from the Far East to the Far West. 
Illustrative of this fact remittances were received a short time since from Portland, Maine, and 
Portland, Oregon, by the same day's mail. Mr. Cary is one of the oldest— if not the oldest— merchaTit in 
Bingham ton that has been in continuous business. He commenced a clerkship with his father in 184 i. 
In February, 184!t, he went to New York city as a clerk in a large iniportint,' house. While there he was 
an active member of the Mercantile Liljrary Association and the New York Volunteer Fire Department. 
In 18.53 he returned to Binnhauiton and opened the first strictly merchant tailoring establislimeut in the 
villa.ge. In 18.5.5 he sold this business and took a position as bookket^Jer in the Bn.oirje County Bank. In 
1862 he resigned this position to enter into copartiiershiii with William Stuart, under the firm name of 
Stuart & Cary. in the publication of Binghamton Daily and Weekly Hepnblican. The Daily was then 
changed from an evening to morning paper. The foil. .wing year he closed his interest m this firm and 
bought one in the oil refining business conducted bv H. Sanford Jarvis and William M. Ely. under the 
firm name of Jarvis, Ely & Carv. In 1865 he bought the entire business, which he conducted until 1867, 
when, under the firm name of Hallock & Cary. he began the wholesale manufacture of ready-made cloth- 
ing being the pioneer in this line in Southern New York. This business was started on what was then 
known as Fraukliu street. When the block north of the Phelps building on Chenango street was con- 
structed. Hallock & Carv moved into it. where they remained until 1871, when the existing firm of Hab 
lock, Cary & Co. erected" and moved into the fii'st iron-front building constructed in the city at 85 and 87 
Court street. In 1880 Hallock & Cary sold their interest and moved to Ehnira, where they contmued m 
the same line until 1885, when Mr. Cary sold out, returning to Binghamton and biiying an mterest in the 
Freeman Overall Co.. of which, the following year, he became sole owner and has continued until the 
present time. While in the Broome County Bank he established and conducted one of the largest insur- 
ance offices of that time. Mr. Cary was one of the " lads" that followed "the boys " around when they 
collected the fire buckets, which each freeholder was required to keep. This was for the organization of 
the first fire (bucket) company in the village. He became a torch boy and has been comie.ted with the 
active and exempt firemen ever since. He was Secretary and Treasurer of tlie old Binghamton Library 
Association. He served a long apprenticeship as a Free Mason, and is the oldest living Past Master in 
the city He is a warden of Christ ( Ei)iscopal) Church, a member of the Board of Trade, also of the 
Binghamton Club. Noting the foregoing, we find that Mr. Cary has had a long and active business 
career, having been connected with some of the largest and most desirable interests in the development 
and substantial growth of the city. Mr. Gary is ably assisted and leaves business largely to the manage- 
ment of his son, Mr. Ralph S. Cary. 



5f 



Lestershire Mfg. Co. 



jS^THK LARGEST MANUFACTURERS OF^ 

Boots and Shoes in The World 



BOSTON OFFICE 66 LINCOLN STREET 

Factory at Lestershire covers eight (8) acres of floor space 

Factory at "Endicott," N. Y., covers six (6) acres of floor space 

Leather tannery at " Endicott," N. Y., covers eiqht (8) acres of floor space 

TOTAL FLOOR SPACE TWENTV-TWO (22) ACRES 

OFFICERS OF THE COMPANY 



H. B. ENDICOTT, President 
ELIOT SPALDING. Treas. and Sec'y GEO. F. JOHNSON. Ger 

C. FRED JOHNSON. Supt. " Endicott" Factory 
H. L. JOHNSON. Supt. LestersHire Factory 
N. C. BR.ODHEAD, Supt. Tannery at " E.ndicott," 



Me. 



it 

i'c 






4J 

4C 



f 



.J/> r4-^ rsi^<si^ cvi^osi^ <>i^ .^i^ <^i^ <^^ osi^ On^ 



S. N. I? F. W. INII I CHELL 



VI,I, KlXns OF 



INSURANCE 

R?:at. Estatk and INIon kv Loan ki) 



74-7(i COLIM' ST. 



O'Nkii, Hi.iir. 



1 1 northwestern mutual Ctfe 



Insurance Company 

OF MILWAUKEE 

Assets over . . $140,000,000 



i^ 



The Northwestern has for the past 25 years 
furnished its insurance at a lower net cost than 
any other company. 



ic^ , ..».,,.,.. ».,,.... .,,.....,0, ,.».,,.,..,,., ..,,.,».. 

-^ %5 <%?■ ■%?> %^ %f> '.-♦s> ^^ '^^^ ^ ♦ -> v^ -^ c^^ c^ <^ <y^ ^^ c^ ^^^ V ^o <y^ c^o c^o <^^ ^^ c^-.^ c^-.^ - -^^- • .^ .^^ ^^ c^' c^.' -^ .' c^ o^ . 



C. A. PELTON, General Agent 

Rooms 778 to 781 O'Neil Building 



CHAS. p. PINTLER 



REAL ESTATE BROKER 



160 Slate Street <yAd Binghamton, N. Y. 

Does a General Real Estate Business ; Buys and 

Sells property in all parts of the United States. 

Rentals 



Special fttleiilioii Given to Hotel Properties 
Correspondence and InvestiQation Solicited 



SAY THERE, CYRUS, 

DO YOU KNOAV 

HAWKES? 

HE SELLS 

Wall Papers, Paints, Oils 
Eeads, VarnisKes, 

Room Mouldings and Window Shades 
^«» 

PICTURE FRAMING.^ A .SpeciaKy 



C. W. HAWKES 



5sj 




'AIRY 



PORT DICKINSON, N. Y. 



SUPPLIES THE Choicest Milk and Cream. Pasteurized. This Product Needs 

No Commendation H ere, as Its Patrons Comprise Our Best 

Citizens, Who Esteem It "Par Excellence- . 



CONNECTED BY 

TELEPHONE AND ELECTRIC CAR LINE 



W. T. HANEY. 



m 



ypmm 



BINGHAMTON'8... 

LEADING. 
LARGEST AND 
UP -TO - DATE 



HOTEL 



if'ifffn-rrrcrrr f?»Pfrr rjr|rr rp r rr g 



'l^!b^ 



S>6c Bennett 



H. I. PROTZMAN R. M. FRASER. 

PROPRIETORS 




BABtotullNOS.'iUUntRWtlOO 



1 






HOUSE FURNISHINGS 

MANTELS, TILING 

GAS AND ELECTRIC 

FIXTUR ES AN D PAINT 

174 WASHINGTON ST. 
125 STATE ST. 




THIS enterprise, now about one year old, started out to manufacture felt of all kinds, and contrary to the condi- 
tions of some new concerns, has been busy ever since in filling orders. They are now installing some of 
the latest machinery known for manufacturing felt to their already well eguipped plant and contemplate 
building new additions at an early date, to accommodate the increasing demand for their goods. Their 
specialty so far has been Saddlery Felt, but under the able supervision of practical and experienced felt makers, 
they now manufacture a line of fine, high class wove felt for mechanical and other purposes. Their goods have 
been successfully marketed so far, having been placed in the hands of dealers in every state in the union, besides 
Canada and Europe. If straightforward, up-to-date business principles count, it is only a guestion of a short 
time when this concern will rank among the leaders in Felt Manufacture. The officers, who are all prominent 
business men of this city, are as follows : 
T, B. CRARY, President PAUL S. ROSS, Vicc-Pres't M. J. CORBETT, Sec'y and Trcas, 



THE STURTEVANT-LARRABEE CO. 
.Carriage and ^leigh IBuilders... 



v[ORTEVANT-[ARfiABEE^. 




CARRIAGE 

%E1GH BUILDER5 ^> 



BINEHAflTON NY 



FACTORY, CHARLES ST. AND ERIE R. R. 
REPOSITORY, STATE ST. 



75 DIFFERENT STYLES CAKRlAGES^Jt^Jtjtjt 
50 DIFFERENT STYLES SLEIGHS To Select From 



Catalogue Free 



W. S. C. SMITH 



SANITARY PLUMBER 



Bar Plumbing A Specialty 



Henry L. Beach, Pres. Z, Bennett Phelps, Treas. 

Wm. G. Phelps, Vlce-Pres. Walter P. Pratt, Sec. S, Mgr. 



OQDEN BRICK CO. 



...MANUFACTURERS... 



BEER PUMPS, FAUCETS. BUILDING BRICK 
BLOCK TIN PIPES, ETC. 



44 HENRY ST., BINGHAMTON, N. Y. 



Blnonaiiiion Bouiino Works 



...MANUFACTURERS OF... 



fine Carbonated 
Beverages 



OUR. GINGER. ALE 

E(}UAL TO THE FINEST IMPORTED 




XI: Ifc^AyEVoG BINGHAMTON, N. Y. 



Austin S. Bump 



Sole flgeiits for SflRflTOGfl STAR SPRING WftT&R 
GAY CSL GODDARD 

10-12 DeRussey St. Binghamton, N. Y. 



Smith (D, Bump 

Etchings, Engravings, Paintings 

Photographic Reproductions 

ART WALL PAPER 

Mouldings, Frames, Novelties, Etc. 

Shades Made and Hung 



A.11 Kinds of Framing to Order 

It e^x^c^h^Vg^e^It^r^et Binghamton, N. Y. 






I iVlylcs Rroon 

THE BEST 5c CIGAR 

on Ihe market, equal to most tens 



NLoonstotic 

^ A lOc CIGAR S?^!^^^'!^^^ 



...MANUFACTURED BY., 



EDWARD GUIEFOYLE 

138-140 STATE ST. 



GRAIND* U>llOIN 

TEAS AND COFFEES 

OUR SUPERIOR GRADES FIND FAVOR IN 
MORE THAN A MILLION HOMESj*^J*.?«J*.'* 

GRAND UNION SPICES are the choicest product of the 
Spice Islands. Try our Spices and you will always use 
them. 

GRAND UNION BAKING POWDER Is the favorite of ali 
Cooks who have tried it. 

GRAND UNION FLAVORING EXTRACTS are celebrated for 
their concentrated strenflth, and their purity we 
guarantee. 

GRAND UNION PREMIUMS make a fine display at our 
store. You should see them. 

GRAND UNION TEA CO. 

Binghamton, N. Y. 



NEW TEAS i 
Freshly Roasted Coffees 2 
i 

Spices, Extracts, Baking Powder ^ 
and Grocery Specialties 



SOLD AT 

THE GREAT ATLANTIC 
AND PACIFIC TEA CO. 

04 COURT ST. 

'Phone 1551 txthange Building 



DAVID P. SELEECK 

....DEALER IN.... 



REAL ESTATE 



INSURANCE <y^ AND LOANS 

Real Estate Bought, Sold, Rented and Exchanged, 
tlouses and Lots, Vacant Lots, Stocks of Goods. 
Business Property and Farms In ail Parts of the City 
and Country For Sale or Exchange, (tlouses and Vacant 
Lots Sold on Monthly Payments Cheap for Cash.) 
To Rent, Flats, tiouses and Suites of Rooms from $^.50 
to $30.00 per month. 

MONEY TO LOAN ON BOND AND MORTGAGE 

Room No. 28 McNamara Block Telephone 394-g 

BINGHAMTON, BROOME COUNTY. N. Y. 



^.^ 






fin 

*^ 
*^ 

^^ 
*^ 

^^ 
*^ 

*^ 
*^ 
*^ 



1 1 EN K ^ V . T U KN E K 
UKAL KSTATl], INSURANCE 

And I^,'^ kstmk> r 1>i:<»ki:i: 



I.i;<;iTlMATK 

i^oANs Nkgoi'iatki) Kntkhi-hises Pi{()jM<»'ri;j» 

Strong Block, I>in(;iiam ton, X. Y. 



a<;t am i:i?ic'ax suukty co. 
im)i:mmiy hoxds 



xf 



^|$$$|||$llllll$lllllll$lll$lllll^ 



M'. G. FAATZ, Hkksidkxt 

C. V. RKV>'OM)S. Vlci:-PltKs. 



G. II. FAATZ. Treas 
"SV. C. KING. SEc'v 



The Faatz-Rea xolds Fkltixg Co. 

ij:sri:!^-"">!^, new vork 





- — IS ,.. fe * ? 



5* 




A.\ KXAt-r KEl'HKSKXTATIOX OF OIH M I MS 

MAN UFACTUKKHS OF 

Eagle Brand" WOOL EELTS 




HOTCHKIN'S 

REAL ESTA TE 

EXCHANGE 



Was established in 1884 by the late William 
S. Hofchkin, and is now continued by his son, 
Charles F. Hotchkin, who has been identified 
with Ihe business since its inception. 

It is one of Ihe oldest and most reliable agen- 
cies in the city for the sale, rental, or exchange 
of any kind of Real Estate anywhere. It is strict- 
ly a commission business and no charges are 
made unless something is accomplished. 

Millions of dollars' worth of property all over 
the United States have been sold or exchanged 
during the past seventeen years, and the firm 
point with pride to the uniform satisfaction ex- 
pressed by their thousands of clients with their 
method of doing business. 

They have occupied the entire second floor of 
the building shown here for more than 15 years, 
and with a force of half a dozen clerks, and all the 
latest, up-to-date office appliances, are able to 
transact any business in their line with neatness 
and dispatch. They also represent three of the 
oldest and best known Fire Insurance Companies, 
viz : Glens Falls, Home of New York and Conti- 
nental. 



SIGNOH S RUBBEH TIHE LIVERY 

OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 



liHori;llAMs 
COllM-: 

RlHItlOK 

IlKl-: 

COACHKS 
1-OK 



UK 1,1.0 :;.-)T 




X'fMIOIHH'S 



W i:i>i>r\(; I?ixi;i-n<)\v, 'J'kas and Thain Cam.s iia\ k ()lh Limost Aitiontion 

BOARDING ANB SALE8 STABLES 



Ofkici: KW) Colht Sthki:!' 



Si AltLK IiKAR II<>ii;i> CHATs'DALI. 



EVER NOTICE 
THAT FOLKS 

Who know "What's What " always 
buy their Shoes of 

NICHOLS? 

It's because we've all the little 
kinks and quirks of newest fashions 
Seen our 

$3.5? SHOE 

MEN'S OR WOMEN'S? 

It's worth just $3.50, no more, no 
less. Some folks say there's not its 
equal in town. What do you say? 

H. A. NICHOLS ^' 

29 COURT ST. 




% 1 

H. A. NILES 

gomml$$ion 
H^ crchant 



BUTTE-R 
CHEESE 
^ EGGS 



Shipments Solicited Qukk Returns.^^ 

.?» 

247 •WATER 5TREE.T 

BINGHAMTON, N. Y. 




r^- 



The Elk Drug Co. 



■n 



^NE of the most prominent, as well as successful, of the many large 
commercial enterprises in our city is THE ELK DRUG CO., which 
occupies a splendid six-story building at No. 26 Henry Street. This 
is fitted up with all the conveniences and appliances known in the business, 
while the laboratory is one of the finest equipped to be found in the State. As 
wholesale and manufacturing druggists and jobbers in paints and varnishes, 
the company occupies a leading place in Northern Pennsylvania and Southern 
New York, over which its very successful travelers make regular trips. The 
house is noted for the splendid range of pure, fresh drugs, chemicals, herbs, 
roots and druggists' sundries bought from the best drug centers of the world 
at close quotations and sold on that basis. As manufacturers and proprietors 
of Dr. Carey's G. E. S. S. remedies it has a line of proprietary medicines of 
the highest merit, and which are in very great demand, while in paints, 
varnishes, etc., it handles only the warrantable goods that always maintain 
the highest standard, in each and every branch the company shows sound 
judgment of values and a thorough knowledge of what is required by the most 
progressive class of druggists and dealers in paints and varnishes, while by 
its customers it always deals in that liberal and equitable manner that has 
brought it such pronounced success. The officers who manage its affairs 
with splendid ability and success are : 



Edgar C. McKallor, President 



Rodney A. Knapp, Treasurer 



Lr 



O 



Stickley-Brandt Furniture Company 



BINGHAMTON. N. Y. 



We Are Large Manufacturers 




If you live In the city a call on us will show you a qreat line of all grades of furniture 
If you live out of town a line from you will bring our illustrated catalog with nearly 
five hundred cuts of all kinds of furniture ^^J-^^^^^^^^ 




176 -WASHINGTON ST. 



127 STATE ST. 



Security /IDutual Xitc flnsuvancc Compan^^ 



Among the prominent and most successful financial institutions of this City is the 
Security Mutual Life Insurance Conipany, occupying a large portion of the Phelps Bank 
Building, and employing in the office forty-five people, with an agency force numbering 
about three hundred, operating in over thirty States of the Union. 

The Company commenced business January 3, 1887, and from its inception its 
progress has been steady until to-day its name is familiar from the Atlantic to the Pacific, 
and from the Great Lakes to the Gulf. Closing its first year in business with $1,000,000 
insurance in force and $15,000 in assets, it now after fourteen years of successful busi- 
ness experience has assets exceeding $1,000,000, with insurance in force aggregating 
over $30,000,000. After providing for the reserve required by law it shows a surplus 
in excess of liabilities amounting to $645,666.46, the largest surplus in proportion to 
liability possessed by any company reporting to the Insurance Department of this State. 

The Company was conceived and projected by Mr. Charles M. Turner, its Secretary 
and General Manager, who by his indefatigable effort and progressive methods is largely 
responsible for the Company's success. His efforts are ably seconded by the officers and 
directors, who are numbered among the leading business men of this City. The officers 
are as follows: W. G. Phelps, President; H. J. Gaylord. Vice-President; Gborge W. 
Dunn, Second Vice-President; J. W. Manier, Treasurer; Charles M. Turner, Secretary 
and General Manager; Z. B. Phelps, Comptroller; F. W. Jenkins, Counsel; R L. 
Lounsberry, Medical Director; Charles A. LaDue, Assistant Secretary; A. B. Howe, 
Assistant General Manager; Moore Sanborn, Superintendent of Agencies, and J. B. 
Abbott, Cashier. 

The Board of Directors are : William G. Phelps, H. J. Gaylord, George W. Dunn, 
George E. Green, Charles M. Stone, Frederic W. Jenkins, James W. Manier, 
Z. Bennett Phelps and Charles M. Turner. 

The Security Mutual Life by its businesslike methods, prompt payment of claims 
and liberal policy contracts, has won the patronage of the best class of people wherever 
it has been presented and the Company is entitled to the first consideration of our citizens 
who contemplate Life Insurance. 



" Its list of Stockholders is a Directory of the Wealth of Binghamton." 

The B""9'^9'^t^" Trust Company 

Cor. STATE AND HENRY STREETS 



Capital and Surplus $ 500,000.00 

Deposits ..... 2,300,000.00 

Does a General Banking Business and pays 3 1-2 per cent. Interest on time deposits. Deposits 
received at any time and in any amount and interest paid from date it left three months or longer. 
Trusts accepted and faithfully executed. Freed from the contingency of death, the Trust Com- 
pany will survive the existence of any trust. 

IS A LEGAL DEPOSITORY FOR COURT MONEYS 

AND RESERVE AGENT FOR. STATE BANKS.g^ 

Offers its services on favorahle terms as Trustee of Corporation Mortgages, Registrar, or Trans- 
fer Agent for Corporations or Municipalities, Loans Money on Bonds and Mortgages and 
Approved Securities. 

OFFICERS 

CHARLES J. KNAPP, President 

JEROME B. LANDFIELD, Vice-Pres't 

A. J. SCHLAGER, Treas. STODDARD HAMMOND, Sec'y JACOB WISER, Cashier 

F. PERCY KNAPP, Asst. Cashier W. J. WELSH, AHorney 

J* 

TKUSTEES 

Charles J. Knapp Stoddard Hammond Adelbrrl J. Schlager F. Percy Knapp Jacob Wiser 

Fred. F. Hammond T. B. Crar\ John B. Simpson G. Tracy Rogers Francis Hammond 

Jerome B. Landfleid J. Stewart Wells (Jeorge W. Dunn W. J. Welsh J. B. LandHeld. Jr. 



vSROORUM ! 
HIAvS vSROORUM!!! 

TKat's SiwasH for ♦♦Best" and ''Very Best. 
j^ j^ \X Applies to -^ -^ 



THE EVENING HERALD 



It's a Remarkable Paper in Every Way. Has nearly 3000 more circulation than 
any Daily Paper In New York State in a City no Larger than Binghamton 

THAT IS BECAUSE IT IS SKOOKUM 

Goes into five of every seven homes in the City of Binghamton. Is delivered by 
paid carrier boys and always has THE NEWS. Is fair and fearless and HAS NO 
STRINGS ON IT. That tells why it is Hias Skookum!! 



IT IS ONLY 25c A MONTH DELIVERED ANYAVHERE 
DAILY CIRCULATION NO>V 9500 IN ROUND N^Ml^^ 



GEO. M. HARRIS 



f 

HEAVY and SHELF t 







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ir 

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•* *♦# %«# »•* ^•# *.•# *•# *♦# %•# *•# *•# **# »V *•# *•# *•# *•* »•# V* »•* M* •Z. 



HARDWARE 



38-40 COURT STREET 



Standing prominently in the 
trade of Binghamton is ttie 
Hardware House of George [VI. 
Harris. This business was es- 
tal>lished by William Harris, the 
father of the present proprietor, 
in 1852, and has been under 
its present management since 
1880. The various depart- 
ments are well stocked with a 
large and comprehensive as- 
sortment of Hardware, Iron and 
Steel, Blacksmiths' and Wagon- 
makers' Supplies, Builders' 
Hardware, Cutlery and House 
Furnishing Goods ; in short, 
everything usually found in a 
first-class establishment of 
this character. 

The location is practically 
the same as that selected for 
the business in 1852. [More 
modern buildings have been 
substituted for the old and the 
establishment has enjoyed a 
large patronage for years, and 
is recognized as one of Bing- 
hamton 's most substantial 
business houses. 



Cbe ?inc$t Summer Resort in Broome County 



■1 




'^^ 







RIVER.SIDE DRIVE AND LESTERSHIRE HEIGHTS 



Fine Boating and Fishing ^ "-. e. wacener <^ Books Open For Picnics 

■/. PROPRIETOR ■/• 

Large Dancing Pavilion (9 binghamton, n. y. U 



Boarders Taken 



J 




WELLINGTON WHITAKER 



LOUIS J. WEST P 



BINGHAMTON^ 
COAL COMPANY 



Ejitablished 1879 



Is Second to None in Supplying tHe Trade witH tHe 
j£^ j^ Best Coal and "Wood j2^ j0^ 



VARO AND OFUCt 
CRANDALL STREET AT GLASS WORKS 



WMITAKER & WEST, PROPS 



TELEPHONE 



BEMAN & CO. 



Manufacturers of 



BoxcSv.< 



Box Shooks 



Keg Heads 



Shoe Nails and Tacks 




'"^Mt^-^^ KEG HEADS 






rvOiV. 



iTAri-r 
lirvViiU 



BINGHAMTON, NEW YORK 




(Swamp-Root is pleasant to tak<.-, i 
Dr KILMER & CO., BlNGHAMTON. N. Y.. U. S. A. 

CHICAGO- ILL., U S A. 

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL. S. A. 

KINGSTON, JAMAICA, B W I. 



Wi^k 



M John M. Poole The Prudential 
i Blank ^ Book ^ maker insurance Company 

of America 



And Book Binder 




Blank Books of all Kinds 

MADE TO ORDER 
Estimates Cheerfully Givers 

166 Water St. Binghamton, N. Y. 



Home Office, NewarK, N. J. 




M. J. DILLON, General Agent, 

FOR SOUTHERN TIER, NEW YORK STATE 



BRANCH office: 

675-676 O'NEIL BUILDING, COURT STREET, 
BINGHAMTON, N. Y. 

Telephone No. ISO v 



)^Jl 



Don't Fail to See Me Before Placing 
Your Life Insurance 



Satisfaction Guaranteed 



»^ 



Agents Wanted fJSv, 



\ WHIPS WHIPiS 

7 Parlor City Whalebone Bone to Handle Parlor City Rawhide 

\ Bengal Bull's hide Ceylon Ox Hide 

L Flexible Steer's hide Gutta Percha Lined 

BINGHAMTON WHIP COMPANY 

MANUFACTUR.E.R.* 

CORRE SPO NDENCE SO LICITED BINGHAMTON, N. Y. 

NOT CONNECTED WITH WHIP TRUST 



THE CITY MISSION 

128 WASHINGTON STREET 

E. E. LOWANS, Superintendent 



'PHE work sought to be done is chiefly Interdenominational Rescue Work. 

/ Located in the centre of the city and with a beautiful and commodious building-, / 

\ it appeals to all Christian people as worthy of their support and presence. We L 

■ heartily welcome everybody to our services, which cannot fail to be helpful to them, i 




that it is not safe to keep your important papers or valuable 
[| articles in your houses? j* ^4 jt Jt ^* jt jt jt ji ^ 

BINGHAMTON SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS 

jj offer you a place for your insurance policies, contracts, wills, 

(J bonds, mortgages and other securities, which is absolutely safe 

n| from lire or burglars. Visitors, whether patrons or not, are al- 

I ways welcome during business hours. Boxes rented from $3 up. 

47 COURT ST. THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK 47 court st. 





227 Chenango St. 



Binghcimton, N. Y. 



Y Modern Conveniences 



Open Day and Mght 



'"aChe Wales" 

C. 8. WALES, Proprietor 
(Formerly known as The North Side Hotel) 



236-238 GhenanQO St.. BINGtlftMTON. N. y. 



LACEY'S BOX FACTORY 

A PROMINENT concern in its line in Binghamton is 
that known as Lacey's Box Factory, which is noted 
for doing the finest w^ork of its kind in the State. The 
proprietor, Mr. J. W. Lacey, established his business here 
in 1883, and in 18''9 removed to present location, 307, 30'', 
31 1 Water Street, ^vhere with increased facilities and more 
commodious place has greatly increased the output. The 
equipment of his factory is of the finest description, com- 
prising four power nailing machines, the only ones in the 
city ; three printing presses and a large embossing ma- 
chine, or press, by the use of which the label is printed 
right on the box. Ijteam is used as the motive power and 
the output is 3,000 to 5,000 boxes per day. The exactness 
and neatness of all work emanating from this establish- 
ment is the subject of favorable comment throughout the 
trade. Mr. Lacey is a native of Pennsylvania, who came 
to Binghamton twenty-five years ago, and has won a last- 
ing success by his enterprise and just methods. 




•'^ D. J. MALANE 



Sanitary.. I 
..Plumber I 

':' 

.J. 

EflSHNnllcTRlFFinilBES | 



1 Sole Agent for Pasteur Germ y 
?i Proof Filter % 



f 88 STATE STREET 



THE ARLINGTON 




HIS hotel was built and is now owned by Messrs. Kennedy & 
Tierney, who have managed it for the past t3 years with 
signal success. Many improvements have been made from 
time to time to meet the wants of our increased patronage 
until to-day we have one of the most modern hotels of its 
class in the State of New York. Within the past two years 
we spent for internal improvements $25,000, and a glance at 
the interior will convince the observer that we have now 
one of the best appointed and furnished first floors to be 
found anywhere. During the past year we added 12 new 
private bath rooms and put in all new sanitary plumbing, 
which now guarantees to our patrons perfect sanitation. We 
have materially improved our cuisine until to-day it is acknowledged by 
the most fastidious epicure that our table is second to none. We have 
more improvements in contemplation for the Arlington which will be 
made within this year. Large and commodious new sample rooms have 
been provided for the accommodation of commercial travelers. 

„*.*We take this occasion to thank our patrons for their patronage in 
the past and cordially solicit a continuance of the same for the future. We 
are also proprietors of the New Rathbun Hotel at Elmira, which is one of 
the best appointed and furnished hotels in the State outside of New York 
City. The service and cuisine are high class in every particular. An up- 
to-date European plan restaurant is run in connection with The Rathbun. 



C 



KENNEDY & TIERNEY, 



Proprietors 




%, 



THE ARLINGTON 

BINGHAMTON, N. Y. 



r 

Binghamton Telephone Company 

INDEPENDENT 

OVER 1000 PHONES IN THIS CITY 

Rates, Houses $15.00 Per Year ^ ^ ^ ^ 
Offices and Business Places $30.00 

LONG LINE SERVICE 



CORNER CHENANGO AND HENRY STS. Din^namiOn, 1>. I. 






ff$tttfft||fttttf$tt$tttffftfft|$ 












ENvSIGN LUMBER CO- 



>VHOLE»SALE 



liutnber, ^ ^hinglcs^ 



p-i\j5iGN Lumber Co. 



"«>ib.»- 



*tf 



.^' 






vSewer Pipe 

Lime, Cement and Lath 

JARVIS ST., BINGHAMTON, N. Y. 



•4«* 
■4«* 

^^ 
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Si 



-^5icsK5K^^5iC5{Cii^iJ?^'iC5K^^5if^2K^5Kslf2K^5{csi?5HljK5jf5iC5i«5lf5^ 




The above cut is one ot our live floors <lcvoted to 

furniture: and china 

WE, FURNISH YOUR HOME COMPLETE 

ESTIMATES GlVEN-^-C'^ DELIVERY PROMPT A^D WITH UTMOST CARE 

A. S. MINER FURNITURE CO. 

7 AND 1 1 COMMERCIAL AVE. 
WAREROOMS, 17 AND 19 COMMERCIAL AVE 




-^J|iJ|Jjj5J}55}5^J|5^5|5^5|5i|;5|55|i5|i^^5^Jfi^^<^^^^^^t^<^<^<^<^<-t^<^<^<^<^ 



■" 




"A COMPLETE. DEPARTMENT STORE" 














Departments 




Departments 






Dress Goods 


^y^d^ /y / /"fUrt 


CONTINUED 






Silks and Velvets 


■<» 






Prints. Ginghams 


^^m W mM\/ jnj^ _^t^ M^ ^\M M M Mm/M m 








and Flannels 


^Iw ^ ^^MKm d^ft/nJjfyi/i^^^^ ^} 


Artists' 

Materials 






Linings 

Linens and Fine 


^f/mfift^*^/^^^^^^^"^ 


Mattresses and 
Bedding 






White Goods 


1 ^^M \j^_^ ^^^^S^^^^^^ 


Upholstery, 






Notions 


X-^ .^^^^^^ 


Curtains, Etc. 






Gloves 




Boots and Shoes 






Veilings and 


Washington, Henry and State Sts., Binghamton, N. Y. 


Toys, Dolls, Etc. 






Neckwear 




Musical 






Hosiery and 
Knit Underwear 




Instruments 








Drugs and 

Toilet Articles 






Women and Chil- 
dren's Muslin 


FEATURES OF THE METROPOLITAN 


Jewelry, Clocks 
and Silverware 






Underwear 




Optical Goods 






Art Embroidery 


j^^ 


Hardware 






and Fancy Yarn 




House 






Corsets 




Furnishings 






Trimmings and 


Special sales will be inaugurated continually, alfording 


Harness and 

Horse Goods 






Buttons 
Laces and 


unlimited buying opportunities. 


Sporting Goods 






Embroideries 




Cutlery 






Ribbons 


A complete restaurant has been established where meals 


Trunks, Valises, 
Etc. 






Handkerchiefs 
Fans and 


will be served at all hours at a moderate cost. 


Baby Carriages 
Sewing Machines 






Umbrellas 
Leather Goods 


All of the latest music— comic, sentimental, operatic. 


Books and 

Stationery 






Millinery 
Furs 


etc., will be sold in the music department. Visitors de- 


Sheet Music 
Groceries 






Cloaks and Suits 


siring to hear any special number can have it tried on 


Meats and Fish 






Waists and 


the piano. 


Fruits and 






Wrappers 


Vegetables 






Men's and Boys' 




Flowers, Seeds, 






Clothing 
Men's Furnishings 


A large soda fountain supplies delicious drinks, and 


Etc. 
Restaurant 






Hats and Caps 


ice cream and the finest confections are always on hand. 


Cigars, Tobacco, 
Etc. 






Merchant 








Tailoring 
Crockery and 

Glassware 
Wall Paper 


On the fourth floor, a ladies' reception room will be 
arranged. 


Candy and 

Soda Water 

Photography 
Dentist 






Stoves 
Pictures and 




Coal Office 






The bureau of information will be for the use of all 


Information 

Bureau 






Easels 


parties. 










. 



When You Come To Binghamton*^ 

(And Become One of Us) — It will be only natural for you to want to know 

^?L'cf Tro BUY HARDWARE ^ ^ .^ 

An examination of our stock and a knowledge of our methods of doing busi- 
ness will quickly convince you that our store is the place. We carry a com- 
plete line of the best makes of BUILDERS' HARDWARE. In MECHANICS' 
and CARPENTERS' TOOLS, none but goods of Known and Guaranteed 
Qualities will be offered you. - - --.---. 

We take great pleasure in showing the High Class of Goods contained in our 

CUTLERY DEPARTMENT ^ ^ 

You will find here the best patterns and qualities of Pocket Knives, Razors and 
Barbers' Supplies, Ladies' Shears and Scissors, Carving Sets and Silver Plated 
Ware. We have the largest and most complete stock of - - - - 

SPORTING GOODS ^ ^ ^ 

Carried by any house in Southern New York. Our line of Guns, Rifles and 
Ammunition, Base Ball Goods and Athletic Goods is complete in every detail- 

CALLAHAN & DOUGLAS. 57 court st. 



BINGHAMTON OVERALL CO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

PANTS, SHIRTS, 
OVERALLS AND 
WORKING MEN'S 
CLOTHING ^J^^ 



S^ 




ONE OF THE .«« .* .* .* 

LARGEST INDUS- 
TRIES OF THIS 
KIND IN THE 
STATE .< ^ .< u< 



THIS enterprise was inaugurated by Mr. Reed B. Freeman in 1880, who is the pioneer in this branch of 
business in this city. This house manufactures strictly for the largest jobbing trade, and its product 
can be found in nearly every state in the union. Mr. Freeman, whose portrait appears herewith, 
was born in Lisle, Broome County, New York, and has resided in this city for the past thirty-seven years. 
During the past twenty years he has employed several thousand Binghamton young ladies. In fact very 
few^ manufacturers have been able to offer to their employes such a desirable and remunerative an occupa- 
tion. Mr. Freeman has always been known as a public spirited citizen and has been for several years and 
is at present the president of the Carmel Grove Chautauqua Assembly, a member of the official board of 
the Centenary Methodist Episcopal Church, and Vice-President of the Board of Trade. 



m 






J-o o4^ <~^i^ <"-V^ '^'♦^ <"^4^<^A^ <'^i-^<>i^ <^^A-^ <^^ 

4' *' *"*'"* *' *"**"*' 

if 

if 
i'c 
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ii 
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a 




^^?3m.' 



ruRrj 



ITURE 




GROCKERr 






i:-p 

|J [n o*j*Direct importers of the celebrated makes of China, soch as Royal Worcester, 

<* t Doulton, Wedgewood, Haviland, Redon, Sevres, Bonn, Royal Vienna, etc. A pleasant 

Tj m place to include in your shopping tour. 

of [J 

if I 

4 McNAMARA (Q. HARDING 

i' S 

4« in 175-177 'WasKington St. BingKainton. N. Y. 



A Draughty 

House K-lr^-c^ 

is the acme of winter ?UC4«-~~^"^^ 




fittttftttflltf 



discomfort. Steam 
and Hot- 



IDEAL Bailers a 
AMERICAN Rad 




i*"^^^:;^? Water Systems give perfect heat 
distribution — there can be no cold 
rooms or hallways. The air is 
rendered evenly warm and balmy. 



RUNYON & OGDEN 

32 COMMERCIAL AVE. 






^||||$|||||$$|||||$|$$|||$|| 



BMRTLETT & GO. 



...MANUFAGTURERSOF. 



is Doors, Sash, Blinds, Mouldings, Frames, 

I I TURNED WORK, ROUGH AND DRESSED LUMBER 

c 

(? 
;) 

;) 

(? 

I 




WE FIT UP DRUG STORES, BANKS. DRY GOODS STORES 

And make a Specially of Interior Hardwood Trim in Quartered Oak, Hazel, 
Mahogany, Curly Birch and all kinds of Foreign and Domestic 'Woods^'J*J« 

CORNER OF 
HAWLEY X COLLIER STS. 




vSTAR ELECTRIC COMPANY 

BINGHAMTON, N. Y.. U. S. A. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 



Hlflh Grade Fire fllariii Teieoraoli flPDaraius 




^ 



STREET BOXES that are 
non-interference in fact as 
well as name, and, owing to 
efficient protectors and im- 
proved methods of con- 
struction, will successfully 
resist ttie injurious influ- 
ences of lightning and ex- 
cessive currents. 



^ 




SOLD UNDER A PERPETUAL GUARANTEE 



ADVANTAGEOUS FEATURES.£y,e> L 
OUR APPARATUS AVORK* IN HARMONY WITH ANY SYSTEM ^ 



ELECTRICITY 

FOR POWER IvS ALWAY5 READY 

50 per cent. Less Than Water or Steam 

«^ 

Over 200 Motors Now in Service ii\ tHe City<^ 
For Li^Kting it is CKeaper THan Gas. No MatcH 

Necessary 

«^ 

FOR PARTICULARS INQUIRE OF 

GENEIRAL E:LECTRIC CO. 

79 STATE STREET BINGHAMTON. N. Y. 






faftilfsA.Mfs/ 



E. G. FREEMAN & CO. 

Sheet metal # Slate Contractors 



1^ 

be 



COPPER AND GALVANIZED IRON CORNICES 
TIN AND SLATE ROOFING 

The Erection of the Blower System Heating: and Ventilating Plants 

A SPECIALTY 

>^ 

Having Done Some of the Largest Contracts in New 
York State, we are Prepared to Furnish Estimates on 
All Classes of Work ^ .< .< ^ .< .* ^ .< ^ ^ 



81-83 WATER ST. 



>5l>5 



^^^^^^^^ 



BINGHAMTON, N. Y. 




J.W-BallardO- 



■w 



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COAL.^'^t 



2 Ewer pi PL 




SALE AGENT 
FOR 



HIGGINSON>S HAR.D AVALL 
PLASTER.. 
SCRANTON FIRE. BRICK 



Delaware 
Lackawanna 
COAL. 



AND 

SHIPPERS 

OF 

CHARCOAL 



ATLAS 

mams 



HELDERBERG 

ROSENDALE 

CEMENT 



GLENS FALLS 

AND 

CHAZY LIMES 



21 JARVIS ST. 



•Phone ^GT 



Cbc Lady jane 6rev School for Girls 



MRS. JANE GREY HYDE 

MISS MARY R. HYDE 

MISS JANE BREWSTER HYDE 



^FECIAL and Regular Courses. Preparation for College and European Travel. 

Number of Boarding Pupils Limited. References required. Girls may be 

Chaperoned to New York, Washington or Europe during the Vacations J-^J-,^j*- 



i 






HI 
H! 



RATES: 

$2.00 PER DMY 



REDECORATED 
REFURNISHED 







MOTEL GRANDALL 



cJOHN W cJAY, 



PROPRIETOR 



LARGE SAMPLE ROOMS, WELL LIGHTED. BATH ROOMS. HEATED 

WITH STEAM. LIGHTED WITH GAS. EQUIPPED 

THROUGHOUT WITH ELEGTRIG BELLS 




Residence of Mark 8. Hotchkiss, 1 7 Grand Ave., Lesterihire, N- V. 







THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

OF l}J]VGIIAMTON 

United States Depohitoky 



CAPITAL !}!4()0,()00.()<l 



FiK>5T Natk^al Bank BuiJvI>in'g 



47 COUirr STREET 



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An Interior Vie-w of ZTAe City's Swell Store 



CHARLES F. SISSON, Prrs. 
CHARLES F. SISSON. Jr., VlirPres. 



BENJAMIN F. WELDEN, Secretary 
WILLIAM W. SISSON, Treasurer 



BINGHAMTON 

Dry Goods 



SISSON BR0THER8-WELDEN COMPANY 

Cor. Court and State Sts. NEW YORK 

Carpets Draperies Men's Furnishings Furniture 



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